Guns, Doodles, Old Dogs and Men 2020-2021

Thread starter #1

GLS

Classic Southern Gentleman
Guns, Doodles old dogs and men 2020-2021

As I sit typing on the last day of the Georgia season, I am somewhat pulled to go today notwithstanding I’ve been the last two days. Legs are tired and with a slight back ache, it’s 50-50. Soon to be 73, I will probably have more seasons left in front of me, but not as many as I have behind me. Abby will be 10 by month’s end and Willa will be 7 just before my birthday. In the natural order, they will run out of time before me. I have left some birds on the swamp’s edge, but I am not angry with them, and I may just grant them peace on this last day. I still have two weeks left in South Carolina. There are a few hours left before I decide, and Willa is snoring beside me on the couch near me and Abby to the side of her wishing Willa would just get up and leave so she could take her spot.

An old dog does good

Knows the short cuts doodles take

She chuckles at miss.

This season where we hunt, we didn’t have birds as numerous as the past few seasons. The birds will normally stack up fairly well where we hunt, but that is both weather and moisture dependent of which were both missing this year. We still found birds, but the difference was notable. The silver lining was that we explored areas that we had ignored in years past and were rewarded. My bird hunting partner Floyd and I learn something new every season.

Tugs a worm from ground

Twitters without an Iphone

Flies through pick-up sticks

This season I mostly shot a new to me gun, a 1930s 2” 12 ga. by Skimin & Wood, from the U.K.. Why a 2” 12 ga. proofed for 7/8 oz.? Wouldn’t a 20 or 28 do? Well, weight for one thing. With 28” barrels, when I got it, it was 5 lbs., 5 oz. I needed to extend length of pull with a leather pad which brought the weight to 5 lbs., 8 oz. Weight is saved from a standard 12 gauge by using less metal in the barrels and a slightly slimmer action bar. The wood is probably less dense than fancy walnut and that is a weight saver, too. It is lighter than any 20 ga. and most 28 gauges currently on the market today. Ammunition sources are limited to one manufacturer, RST, and shells aren’t Wally World cheap. I handloaded and roll crimped trimmed paper hulls with fiber wads and 7/8 oz. of #8 lead. While the majority of time I carried the 2” 12 ga., I hit a streak of misses and changed my luck with my Ithaca SKB 10 20 ga. Floyd was as dead-eyed as usual with his Ithaca SKB 100 20 ga. Beware of the man who only shoots one gun. Because of the Covid era, we drove separate trucks and as usual, for social distance, I dragged 20 yards behind him in the woods, a product of my shorter legs on which sits a tenth of a ton.







Old man missing birds

Nothing startling with that news

Business as usual

Here are a few photos of this season. Abby is rolling in something that smells worse than she.

Rivercane hideout

“Gotcha” mumbled Brittanys

The nose knows all



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trad bow

wooden stick slinging driveler
Time spent with hunting companions both two legged and four legged are what great days are made of. Birds harvested or not, is a joyous part of the trip to be sure. Sounds like another memorable season.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
Great stuff, I really enjoyed this post. :cheers:
 
Awesome read, TKS.
Have fond memories of my brittany Jed, an old 20 ga SKB O/U and a few doodles taken home. Alternated between 1100 in avatar and "fancy" O/U.
 
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Thread starter #11

GLS

Classic Southern Gentleman
Addendum

Thanks, fellas. I appreciate the comments. I managed to take advantage of the last day and used it to scout another place. Five flushes, shots at two, but no cigar over the course of an hour and a half. Members of the MuttPak, Willa and Abby, participated.

Here’s an excellent history of the 2” 12 ga. It’s definitely a niche gun used in a niche pursuit of birds around these parts.

https://shootingsportsman.com/short-shell-12-2-guns/

Where we found birds ranged from low to high terrain and parts in between. Around these parts, low to high is several feet. Deep in the rivercane is Floyd. Look for the orange. At one time we thought birds would exclusively be in the cane. We couldn’t have been more wrong.

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Nic, here are some more photos of the gun. Not too fancy, nor too plain. Is it a practical gun? Of course not, but since when does that matter? ;) Gil











 
Enjoyed the post. Love the shotgun. I believe I won a bid on an L. C. Smith Featherweight Ideal Grade today in 12 Gauge. I have been chasing my upland birds with an L. C. Smith Field Grade 16 Gauge this year. I do not know about you, but the older I get, the worse my shooting gets. The days of me taking a double on a wild covey rise with a .410 are long gone. I am lucky to get a single on a covey rise with my 16 Gauge any more. My woodcock have been rather spooky this year, it might be my dog is getting too old, she is in the double digits now....or I am just mentally making that fact up as an excuse for my bellow par shooting.
 
Nice pics! Looks like fun. We have a bunch of them around our club, I've killed a few in the past. Taste great!

BTW, I have a shotgun that looks almost identical to yours. It was given to me almost 45 years ago from an old judge in Alabama. I don't use it or know the name of it.
 
Thread starter #16

GLS

Classic Southern Gentleman
My Older Dog, Abby, turned 10 yesterday. Here’s her after a great hunt 7 years ago to the week, just after turning 3. Jeff, Floyd , Floyd’s late great Snap (Pop and Sadie's mom), Abby and I had a great day. I thought I killed her from exhaustion. She was worn out and I had to carry her from the truck to inside home where she laid by her food bowl and ate lying down. In the morning her stub of a tail spun like a propeller ready for action. While I hope to get more seasons with her in the woods, her legacy is in what she has passed down to half-sister Willa. Willa became a fine dog by hunting with her; other than “whoa” and coming to command and whistle, she learned it all by tagging along with Willa, Sadie and Pop.

Floyd, Sadie, Willa and I celebrated her birthday hunting new areas and had 7 flushes and 3 down. At 10 according to tracking collars she covers 10% more ground than 6.5 years old Willa. Today, 6 flushes and two down. Tomorrow will be our last day. It was an interesting season in the Covid Era; not as productive as the past two seasons, but rewarding in so many ways. Dog work is dog work whether it’s pinning down a covey of quail or a solitary woodcock. The flush is always an adrenaline pumping surprise regardless of how often we experience it. I’m looking forward to tomorrow and next December.

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Thread starter #17

GLS

Classic Southern Gentleman
This year, as in the past, we have killed birds within 150 miles of this sign. With the sign as a starting point, look for rivercane, dense thickets with wet woods. When conditions are dry, go high. Hope this helps. Gil
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GLS, Senior hunting Britts have a special place in my heart, mine was named Jed.
Jed was the best hunter I had the pleasure of hunting with, also carried him back to the truck once. Got a big ol slurpy kiss from him half way back.
 
Thread starter #19

GLS

Classic Southern Gentleman
Ace,
That's a great story. Floyd's Pop will be 12 this May. He's a big male Britt, 60 lbs. before the season. The spirit is willing, but the strength of his flesh is of concern. He dropped some weight and still had some get up and go which improved. He hates being left in the kennel when Floyd takes Sadie to areas we wouldn't want to have to carry him out. We have a loop route we hunt Pop that takes an hour and a half to circle. We never get more than a 150 yards from roads that complete the loop. While he hasn't required us carrying him, this circuit would make it easy to get him to one of our trucks. He's been a great dog.
In my vest is a dog carry harness that we haven't had to deploy for carrying a dog on our backs out of the woods. I hope I never have to use it. Gil
 
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