I’m a bit puzzled

killerv

Senior Member
I finally got my old Model 70 30.06 put back together and went to the range to zero. Used a laser bore sighter at 25 yards and got it pretty close to the red dot. Got set up at 50 yds, removed the bolt and looked through the bore. Centered the target in the bore and adjusted the scope to the center of the target. Fired two rounds, both were about two feet low and two feet right. I didn’t expect it to be dead on but I sure didn’t expect it to be off that far. What am I missing?
why did you adjust the scope again without shooting if you had just bore sighted it at 25? Trust the bore sighter. Shoot at 25 and see where it hits. I then adjust to about 1in low at 25, then move out to 100.

The holding the rifle and adjusting to impact can be tricky, almost need an extra set of hands. I like to shoot a 3 shot group at 100 and then do my clicks based on group center.
 

Rich M

Senior Member
I use a large sheet of cardboard, put target in center - start at 50 feet and shoot for dead center - adjust by moving scope windage screw before I move the crosshair adjustments. That way the scope is aligned perfect, then will be less clicks to change stuff.

Then I shoot 100 yards and is usually real close, get centered.

Then 200, then 250 and I'm out of distance at the place I go to shoot.

3 shot groups, sometimes 2 if they are right next to each other. Adjust the groups and not try to do single bullets. Waste a lot of ammo trying to adjust at every shot...
 

Stroker

Senior Member
why did you adjust the scope again without shooting if you had just bore sighted it at 25? Trust the bore sighter. Shoot at 25 and see where it hits. I then adjust to about 1in low at 25, then move out to 100.

The holding the rifle and adjusting to impact can be tricky, almost need an extra set of hands. I like to shoot a 3 shot group at 100 and then do my clicks based on group center.
Same here. I use the 2 inch stick on dots and pizza boxes. Bore sight with collimator, shoot three shots, make adjustments, three more shots and fine tune from there. I usually allow at least 15 minutes between the three shot groups for the barrel to cool by shooting other rifles or hand guns. Normally I can get one sighted in and fine tuned with 12 to 15 rounds.
 

rayjay

Senior Member
The hole down the "center" of a factory bbl is not going to be straight. Depending on how much the tooling wandered you can have quite a lot of curve which will make the bullet go somewhere other than where you eyeball or bore sighter says it should. Even high dollar custom bbls have some curve in the bore.
 

killerv

Senior Member
Same here. I use the 2 inch stick on dots and pizza boxes. Bore sight with collimator, shoot three shots, make adjustments, three more shots and fine tune from there. I usually allow at least 15 minutes between the three shot groups for the barrel to cool by shooting other rifles or hand guns. Normally I can get one sighted in and fine tuned with 12 to 15 rounds.

learn to trust your scope and clicks more I bet you could get that down to 5 shots.

I boresight, shoot once at 25, adjust scope to get me about 1in low, sometimes I shoot a 2nd at 25, all depends on just how far off that first shot might have been. Then I move to 100, shoot a group, not caring about where it is hitting, then do my math/clicks to where I want that group to move to. I'll usually let it rest and shoot that final shot. 4-5 shots is about all it ever takes to get one sighted in, could be less if I didn't shoot the 3 shot group but I like to see how small they can be.
 

rayjay

Senior Member
When zeroing a scope you need the rest to be totally steady. With a good rest set up you hold the crosshair on the center of the target and shoot a shot. Then reset the gun in the rest and wiggle it around until the crosshair is back on the center of the target. Then using the turrets dial the crosshair to the hole. One or two more shots should be all that is needed.
 

Stroker

Senior Member
learn to trust your scope and clicks more I bet you could get that down to 5 shots.

I boresight, shoot once at 25, adjust scope to get me about 1in low, sometimes I shoot a 2nd at 25, all depends on just how far off that first shot might have been. Then I move to 100, shoot a group, not caring about where it is hitting, then do my math/clicks to where I want that group to move to. I'll usually let it rest and shoot that final shot. 4-5 shots is about all it ever takes to get one sighted in, could be less if I didn't shoot the 3 shot group but I like to see how small they can be.
I've used the same process when I'm in a hurry to get one sighted in but I prefer three shot groups, not only tells me what the gun is doing, but tells me if I may be part of the problem. I find trigger time invaluable when it comes to accuracy. Besides that I just like to shoot.
 
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