I sense more COVID closures are coming

dwhee87

Senior Member
From a quick search of various state COVID websites, State of Illinois also is reporting total tests, regardless if they're patient dups.
 
My household and I are maintaining 90%+ reduced social contact and adhering to social distancing and respiratory hygiene requirements carefully. But when we do get out, we see folks being very careless with respect to social distancing (except for church). It's almost like they have hit the "back to normal" switch and are incapable of maintaining social distancing when out and about.

I don't really believe most parents _want_ school from home to continue into the 2020-2021 school year. Nor do I think most working people want forced business restrictions and other closures. But by taking this "back to normal" attitude, I think this is what they are going to get.

It's not just about the increased numbers, it's that it is so obvious most of the general public cannot be trusted to maintain social distancing requirements when allowed out. And don't even get me started on what parents are allowing their children (up to 18) to do. Enjoy the school year, you've earned it!
and just when I thought I was one of the few on this forum that felt that way. As a nation, we are contributing to our own demise by putting our "freedom" to not follow common sense recommendations from the scientific and medical communities over the inconvenience of masks and social distancing for the public good. Reminds me of how the Roman empire fell...one stupid, selfish decision at a time.
 

j_seph

Senior Member
Cloth face coverings:
  • May be commercially produced or improvised (i.e., homemade) garments, scarves, bandanas, or items made from t-shirts or other fabrics.
  • Are worn in public over the nose and mouth to contain the wearer's potentially infectious respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks and to limit the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), to others.
  • Are not considered personal protective equipment (PPE).
  • Will not protect the wearer against airborne transmissible infectious agents due to loose fit and lack of seal or inadequate filtration.
  • Are not appropriate substitutes for PPE such as respirators (e.g., N95 respirators) or medical face masks (e.g., surgical masks) in workplaces where respirators or face masks are recommended or required to protect the wearer.
  • May be used by almost any worker, although those who have trouble breathing or are otherwise unable to put on or remove a mask without assistance should not wear one.
  • May be disposable or reusable after proper washing.
Surgical masks:
  • Are typically cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as medical devices (though not all devices that look like surgical masks are actually medical-grade, cleared devices).
  • Are used to protect workers against splashes and sprays (i.e., droplets) containing potentially infectious materials. In this capacity, surgical masks are considered PPE. Under OSHA's PPE standard (29 CFR 1910.132), employers must provide any necessary PPE at no-cost to workers.1
  • May also be worn to contain the wearer's respiratory droplets (e.g., healthcare workers, such as surgeons, wear them to avoid contaminating surgical sites, and dentists and dental hygienists wear them to protect patients).
  • Should be placed on sick individuals to prevent the transmission of respiratory infections that spread by large droplets.
  • Will not protect the wearer against airborne transmissible infectious agents due to loose fit and lack of seal or inadequate filtration.
  • May be used by almost anyone.
  • Should be properly disposed of after use.
Respirators (e.g., filtering facepieces):
  • Are used to prevent workers from inhaling small particles, including airborne transmissible or aerosolized infectious agents.
  • Must be provided and used in accordance with OSHA's Respiratory Protection standard (29 CFR 1910.134).
 

MudDucker

Moderator
Staff member
A business has the right to refuse service to anyone other than for reasons protected by law, which are usually found in the civil rights laws.

At my office, due to the potential liability, you will wear a mask or opt for video conferencing. Why, because the hassle of someone claiming to have been infected at my office are more than I care to deal with these days. I've not had one complaint with that requirement.

By choice, I wear a mask when entering stores with many customers and stay away from folks, because I chose to try to avoid getting infected. Why, I'm at the age and have an underlying condition. I refused to shelter in place though.

I've posted before, my conversations with medical folks who are highly trained in infectious diseases nearly all have one theme, we aren't going to stop this thing and it needs to run its course through the low risk population rather than slow rolling the infection by spotty protection. A herd with anti-bodies is a herd that is no longer a carrier. From the numbers, that is what appears to be happening. Only a small spike in hospitalizations.
 

1eyefishing

...just joking, seriously.
Q:

Can the virus become weaker as it is fought off and passed along by the population? By that I mean is it still going to be as potent 18 months down the road as it is when it 1st came on scene?

Medical opinions anyone?
 
Q:

Can the virus become weaker as it is fought off and passed along by the population? By that I mean is it still going to be as potent 18 months down the road as it is when it 1st came on scene?

Medical opinions anyone?
I think it's more like a cold than say the measles. But you might have some immunity to it until it mutates.

Since it's more like the common cold or influenza, not really much we can do to stop it from doing what it wants to do in regards to its potential in 18 months from now.

If and when it mutates, it may weaken from causing the same trouble. I wonder if it could mutate and become worse?
 
Virus mutations aren’t necessarily a bad thing. Every virus mutates; it’s part of the virus life cycle. Those shifts and changes aren’t always a big deal.
In some cases, those mutations may actually lead to a weaker virus. Usually, though, the changes are so slight that there’s no noticeable difference in the disease’s transmission and fatality rates.

Though there’s the very rare chance a virus could mutate to be more aggressive, if anything, RNA viruses are more likely to mutate into a weaker version.

“Nearly all mutations will make some part of the virus work less well than before.

I'm guessing time will make it less worse more so than more of us catching it, like in a year from now. It could get worse now or 3 months from now though.
 
I think it's more like a cold than say the measles. But you might have some immunity to it until it mutates.

Since it's more like the common cold or influenza, not really much we can do to stop it from doing what it wants to do in regards to its potential in 18 months from now.

If and when it mutates, it may weaken from causing the same trouble. I wonder if it could mutate and become worse?
I’m no dr but In the beginning of this I read several articles that said generally they will mutate to be less severe in order for the virus itself to stay alive and keep spreading. If that’s true or not I have no idea.
 
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