If I have fly reel, how much more do I need to spend?

Thread starter #1
I bought a Gold Cup III BassPro reel from a thrift store for $8. I figured it wasn't that big of a risk. It looks nice, no rust, turns smooth, etc. Also has line on it. How much more should I expect to spend if I want to use it? I only wanted a basic setup to catch some bream, so I can practice for trout or something. I didn't want to buy things I didn't need (not yet anyway.)

I saw a wide range or prices at Cabela's, but one time the guy in the store said I had to "match" the reel with a rod, and I couldn't just buy any rod. I don't know if that was accurate.
 

1eyefishing

...just joking, seriously.
Pretty sure he was talking about matching the reel size and the line size with the rod size. Numbers usually 1 through 10. If you have a 3 weight reel and line, you need a 3 weight rod, approximately.
 
I bought a Gold Cup III BassPro reel from a thrift store for $8. I figured it wasn't that big of a risk. It looks nice, no rust, turns smooth, etc. Also has line on it. How much more should I expect to spend if I want to use it? I only wanted a basic setup to catch some bream, so I can practice for trout or something. I didn't want to buy things I didn't need (not yet anyway.)

I saw a wide range or prices at Cabela's, but one time the guy in the store said I had to "match" the reel with a rod, and I couldn't just buy any rod. I don't know if that was accurate.
It’s accurate. You need to match the reel and rod for depending on the length of rod you want. What’s the reel size? And when you say line, does it have just backing on it or backing and fly line?
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
You don't need an expensive reel for most trout fishing, it's basically a line holder. But, it does need to be matched weight-wise with your rod for the whole rig to balance properly. Basically, if you have a 5-weight fly rod, get a 5/6 reel. With something like a 10' nymphing rod, I go up a size to give more weight at the butt.
 
From what I can see onlline, that's a heavy duty fly reel for an 8 weight line or so. You'd be talking striped bass, light salt water, etc. Too heavy for trout and bream.
I use an 8 wt on the Hooch for big browns occasionally but agree with you. I looked it up too and saw the same thing. Good price the OP paid though!
 
Maybe I should sell it and get a suitable setup for smaller fish.
Sell it and get a Cabelas combo deal in 5 wt. won’t break the bank, good quality, good all around setup for bream, trout, small bass.
 

pjciii

Senior Member
I would have an outfitter take a look at reel. If you saved a bunch on the reel put that money elsewhere Like line or rod.

If it operates smoothly dont throw the baby out with the bath water.
 
Thread starter #14
Here is a picture. How much you think it is worth the the line? I don't know what it has, and I couldn't find it on ebay. It turns super smooth. I am guessing that's a good thing?

Capture.JPG
 

yaknfish

Senior Member
First off, it looks like you got a great deal. Even if it is something you don't really need. The writing on the reel foot should be a hint. Weight Forward 9 Floating. That's salt water / big bass stuff. The foot also says ST. That might be Sink Tip, maybe the black part of the line.

You could sell it and use the money for a more suitable rig, or set it aside until you want to go to the coast. Buy a 9 weight rod and cast for big stuff. (I wouldn't start there. Casting a 9wt can wear you out fast.)

I fish for panfish with a 4 or 5 weight. I really like the 4. But, honestly, the 5 is more versatile when it's time to cast sub-surface flies or bigger poppers. Buying a matched set isn't a bad idea. My 5 weight is a Reddington Crosswater kit. I like it a lot, though replacing the line with a better one really made a difference.
 
That is a sealed drag, large arbor reel, those typically are saltwater reels. Get you a 9wt rod and have fun with it the next time you go to the beach. There is not much better fly fishing wise than catching a nice redfish on fly fishing gear, they readily take flies and are rather easy to catch.
 
That reel will probably work great, but I doubt that it will bring much on the used market.


IMO - a 9 foot, 9 wt. outfit is the best all-round setup you can have for saltwater fishing. It would be great for almost all freshwater striper fishing and big bass fishing, as well.

I'd buy a decent 9', 9wt rod moderately priced rod (Sage Foundation, Orvis Clearwater, etc.) and get a really good quality floating line and an intermediate line (Scientific Anglers or Cortland - (Pro Shop Quality)).


I think a setup like that would be very versatile.
 
That reel will probably work great, but I doubt that it will bring much on the used market.


IMO - a 9 foot, 9 wt. outfit is the best all-round setup you can have for saltwater fishing. It would be great for almost all freshwater striper fishing and big bass fishing, as well.

I'd buy a decent 9', 9wt rod moderately priced rod (Sage Foundation, Orvis Clearwater, etc.) and get a really good quality floating line and an intermediate line (Scientific Anglers or Cortland - (Pro Shop Quality)).


I think a setup like that would be very versatile.
I agree with what you are saying, however, I do believe he will be in for "sticker shock" when he goes to buy one or more saltwater lines. The reason I say that is if he gets one of your average freshwater lines the first time he goes to use it on a hot summer Florida or southeast GA day in saltwater the line will have issues. Conversely, if he gets a decent tropical saltwater line and goes striper fishing in N. GA he will be frustrated after a couple of casts into cooler water when the line looses all its flexibility. I have only found one line that works decently in both situations, the Rio Outbound Short Shooter direct core, it holds up to river fishing in south GA without getting stiff and does well in the mangrove "jungles" of the tropics such as places like Belize or the Yucatan. Shorter shooting heads are also easier for new fly fishermen to cast because you do not need as much line out to load your rod for a cast. I honestly believe trying to skimp on fly line (by that I mean trying to make one or two lines fit all situations) leads to a lot of fly fishing outfits ending up being stuck in the rod rack or in the garage due to the fact a line is used that is not matched to the situation they might be fishing. If you fly fish in numerous areas and target numerous species you learn real fast the line is more important often than the reel one chooses especially in most freshwater situations, that is the reason I usually have a spare spool or two for each of my more than a couple of dozen reels. But then again, I am a tackle "ho" and have a large collection of tackle, more than some shops I have been in. Interestingly all of my freshwater striper fishing is for river fish in the Flint River, below the dam at Seminole or in the lower Chattahoochee and have found that a Spey Outfit is best for my bank fishing forays for ol' lineside. I would also advise to leave the intermediate and sinking lines alone for a beginner because I have seen some have issues with being able to pick them up out of the water to cast again and mess up their back cast.....
 
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Since you asked how much more you need to spend, I’ll throw some numbers at you:

Rod - $350.

I recommend the Sage foundation. As others have said, you need to buy the right rod weight for your reel. If you have a 7/8 weight reel, you need a 7 or 8 weight rod.

Alternative rods:

TFO makes some roads at a decent price. I’ve never used TFO, but would like to try one.

Redington is owned by Sage. I’ve heard good things about their rods as well.

Lastly, I’ve caught trout with an Orvis clear water rod. You may want to check one out.

The Orvis, TFO, and Redington rods are all cheaper than Sage ($350). I am just partial to Sage because they’re made in America.

Fly line - $80

Scientific Anglers Mastery MPX is about $80. Rio Gold Freshwater is about $80-$100.

Fly line is arguably more important than the rod so it’s important to get a good one.

Fly line weight needs to match your rod weight. I’d recommend starting with a weight forward floating fly line.

Leader - $12.95

You can get a three pack of RIO leaders for this price. Leader thickness is the number with ‘X’ next to it. You need to match this to your fly size. Rule of thumb is fly size divided by 3 is the leader size you want (example: size 12 fly divided by 3 gives you 4X leader size).

Flies - $20

You can get a decent assortment of flies from a company like Big Y for $20. Some places are more expensive. I do ok with Big Y flies. You will lose flies and it hurts when it’s a $3 fly (adds up over time).

Total - $463.

If I were you, I’d just get a combo set up. These range from $525 (Sage foundation) to $350 (Orvis Clearwater). The combos include reels, line, and leader.

Having two reels isn’t a bad thing in fly fishing (sometimes you want to use different fly line on the same trip).

Now you can stand on the banks or in the shallow waters and cast.

If you want waders and boots, waders are going to be at least $200. You need these for cold water. They have some on Amazon for cheaper. I have almost bought Frogg Toggs and Compass 360, but didn’t trust the reviews. I have always used the cheapesy Orvis waders I can get. Hopefully, someone here has tried those other brands and can enlighten us.

The Chattahoochee below Buford dam is pretty cold all the time (even summer). You may or may not be able to handle wet wading it in the warm months, but you’ll be on the couch all winter without waders. Waders are like tires. You’re lucky if you get 5 years out of them. So go cheap with waders as you can for a pair from a good brand (Orvis, Simms, Redington).

You’ll also need wading boots. I’d get a good pair here because you’re going to be walking a lot. I like the Simms Freestone ($165).

I’d also have about $150-$200 for various other things (strike indicators, split shot, vest, etc).

So that’s my two cents on how much you would have to spend to get going.
 
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