Interested in Photography

Thread starter #1

GrlsHnt2

Senior Member
I am interested in photo taking. I don't mean just snapshots of the kids ball games or the dogs running around. I mean like seeing the sun shining on a leaf and just stopping to take a picture. Can someone tell me where to start?
What type of camera would you recommend I start with and what type of accessories are a necessity when first starting out?
I don't really like digital cameras, but I do like the fact you can see your pic when you take it. I just prefer still taking a roll of film to have it developed. If any of you have a good digital camera that works as good as the 35mm film type, let me know.
Any suggestions are appreciated!
 

rip18

Senior Member
Looks like you are interested in taking a big bite to start with. Go for it! I'd suggest that you check into a local camera club or one of the "intro to photography" courses - sometimes just a day long, or sometimes 2 days, or something like that that is offered by a local camera club or community college. Those kinds of things give you a good overview.

The DSLRs (Digital Single Lens Reflex) cameras today are as good as or better than the 35mm of 10 years ago. They take the same lenses, etc. and still provide that instant feedback - you will know instantly if you "goofed" and need to shoot again... And there are no film developing costs (though there are software & storage & computer costs).

I would say start with either Canon or Nikon. Depending on how serious you think you want to get, I would suggest starting with either a "consumer" digital body or a "prosumer" digital body - though you may bite the bullet and go ahead & start with a "pro" digital body.



I'm sure we'll be glad to answer other more specific questions that you might have... just keep asking.
 

jason308

Senior Member
Well......Here is my two cents worth....

I think you would be served well with an entry level DSLR like a Nikon D40 (or any other brand's offering).....You get more control than with most point and shoots (even the advanced ones), and you can always add lenses, filters or anything else....

I have printed photos taken with my old D40 that looked just as good as 35 mm prints....Having said that, there is a lot more that goes into printing digital images IMO.....Where and how they are printed, etc.

It all comes down to you and your personal preference-but I will that the user makes more of a difference than the equipment (good equipment is necessary, but you have to know what to do with it too)...Best of luck, looking forward to seeing some photos here soon!!!!
 

Hoss

Moderator
I'd say you've chosen a good place to start. Lots of good information posted on this forum. I'd say that having some idea of what you will be photographing and then how much you want to spend will help in the decision of what you need in a camera. DSLR's provide the greatest flexibility, but at a cost. Gotta pay for each lens. If you need less flexibility, point and shots take some great photos as evidenced here on the forum with less intitial cost. Again, it kind of depends on what you want to do and your budget.

As Jason pointed out, the photographer plays a greater role than the equipment.

Hoss
 
Thread starter #5

GrlsHnt2

Senior Member
Helpful so far. I don't want to spend $10 grand starting out, LOL. I want something that is good to start out with and "play" with so I can determine if this is something I really wat to turn into a full time hobby. Kepp the advice coming.
 

Razorback

Senior Member
GrlsHnt2,

Lots of places to start & here is probably the best...a lot of shared interest.:banana:

If you want formal schooling;
North Georgia Tech & Gwinnett Area Tech both offer a 2yr degree in Photography.

Less formal;
Gwinnett Area Tech, Lanier & I believe Gainesville offer some variation of continuing ed classes. The Show Case School of photography is the spin off of the former Southeastern School of Photography. Both Nikon & Canon offer lessons on their websites.

Canon;
http://www.usa.canon.com/dlc/controller?act=HomePageAct

Nikon;
http://www.nikondigitutor.com/index_eng.html
http://www.nikonschool.com/
http://www.nikonnet.com/

Get a good basic setup that lets you grow & add to & DIVE IN.

Razor
 
Thread starter #9

GrlsHnt2

Senior Member
OK. I have spent quite a bit of time reading all the posts on here. I have learned a few things already and don't even have my camera yet. My husband is getting me the D40x for Christmas. I know I need a tripod and an extra memory card. This camera will also be coming with the extra zoom lens (i think it is 55-200 or 300---can't remember). Is there anything else I absolutely need (or you would recommend) to get started?
 

ronfritz

Senior Member
Kinda depends on how much loose cash there is....First thing I'd probably buy after what you already have is a camera case and then a sky or UV filter for each lens to keep the lens front element from getting dinged and then a second battery. A poloarizing filter for the wider angle lens to ensure you get those blue skies. Next would be a flash. The SB-400 or SB-600 flashes go with Nikon's D40x.
 
Thread starter #12

GrlsHnt2

Senior Member
Kinda depends on how much loose cash there is....First thing I'd probably buy after what you already have is a camera case and then a sky or UV filter for each lens to keep the lens front element from getting dinged and then a second battery. A poloarizing filter for the wider angle lens to ensure you get those blue skies. Next would be a flash. The SB-400 or SB-600 flashes go with Nikon's D40x.
Whew...I need to start a list I guess. Thanks!
 

jason308

Senior Member

Razorback

Senior Member
Lots of good info on this thread but stick to what you NEED first~camera-lens-memory card-battery-light & a subject...the rest of the list makes it easier to go take some pictures.

*Bag (fanny pack, back pack, shoulder bag, hard case, commuter type etc...lots of styles but no perfect bag for all occasions just better for most) to keep everything together including cheat sheets & or manuals

*Second battery~specially if you plan to download using your camera, no battery no shooting

*Second, third or even forth memory card~more is better if a card nuts up on you while shooting, erase one to many pix or if you want to shoot a lot

*card reader~minimum of USB 2.0, makes down loading much easier

*UV~filter for basic protection of lenses, I'd rather clean a cheap but good filter, that's easy to replace than the front element

*Polarizer~great for darkening skies, getting slow shutter speeds for water effects

*a better neck strap~just personal opinion...I like the neoprene styles

*Bigger flash when your ready SB600 or SB800

*tripod & remote release again when your ready

*TIME & lots of it to go shoot :bounce:

Razor
 

ronfritz

Senior Member
Sorry for the scary list.

The bag and UV filters are, in my opinion, necessities to protect the money you spent on the camera.

The battery, card reader, extra cards are valuable because they reduce grief and aggravation.

The polarizer, is not a necessity but it is what you need to ensure you get the nicest sky possible. Without it you may end up with those photos that would be nice if they had the blue sky you saw. For what they cost, I'd put one towards the top of the list. Just remember you need to rotate them to get them 'dialed' in each time you use them. You can't just screw it on the lens and take a picture.

The flash...well...most folks end up discovering that the on camera flash is a) weak for longer or room filling shots or b) has a tendancy to over expose because the light rays come shootin straight out of it and over expose some part of the picture - like the forehead of person you're aiming at. The SB-400 can tilt so that you can bounce the flash off the ceiling to diffuse it. You can also buy a cheap diffuser for the 400. The SB-600 is bigger, stronger, tilts and rotates so you can bounce off the wall and reorient the flash if you rotate the camera into Portrait position. They make diffusers to fit the 600 too.

If another $125 for flash and diffuser is too much, then maybe you could spend $20 for a Gary Fong Puffer - its designed to diffuse the on camera flash. I just got one and it works nice as long as the subject is within 10 feet or so...fine for the quick shots of the granddaughter for which I intended to use it.

I think a lot of folks live without the flash for quite a while - I did - but once you have one, you kinda can't live without it.
 

ronfritz

Senior Member
Well...I'm sitting here doing some online Christmas shopping for an unspecified relative's gift. Other unspecified relatives are going in with me on this present. The Nikon D40 is a contender and I figured I'd show you the cart.

I'm not getting a polarizer, second battery or card reader; if the unspecified relative really needs/wants those, the unspecified relative can get them for his/her self or maybe those items can be what we get the unspecified relative for their next birthday or next Christmas.

I picked the two card value pack just because it seemed like a good deal. I don't think the unspecified relative needs the more expensive, faster cards. So far, the D40 rather than the D40x is what we're going with. I'm not sure the extra 4 megapixels matter. More than half the really good shots you see on this forum were taken with 6 MP cameras. The D40 has a faster flash sync speed too. That's not to tell you that you should NOT get the D40x, its just to explain why, for my unspecified relative, we are inclined to choose the D40. The one we are getting the unspecified relative comes with the 18-55 and 55-200 lenses. The price is very reasonable for the camera with two lenses.

Let's hope none of the unspecified relatives read this in case I change our mind and get the unspecified relative a Nikon P5100 or a Canon S5 IS. :)
 

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rip18

Senior Member
Photoshop Elements or some other "processing" & "organizing" software...
 
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