Kaboom!

Thread starter #1

Wiskey_33

Senior Member
I thought this only happened to GLOCKs?:bounce:






Guy said he was a little light on his H110. Detonation!

The thread can be found on ar15.com, but I didn't post the link as the language would get me a knuckle smack.
 
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Buzz

Senior Member
Reloading mistakes can blow up any firearm in any caliber, but we've beat the Glock issue to death. I don't doubt that most Glock Kabooms happen with poorly loaded ammo, but there have been documented cases where they blew with good ammo too and the reasons are well documented.

I suppose I'd be a little more intrigued by this Kaboom, if the person didn't say they made a mistake in their reloads. If he would have followed the loading data provided by Hodgdon, this would have never happened.
 
Thread starter #3

Wiskey_33

Senior Member
I wasn't trying to dig that crap out of the hole again.

The guy is lucky he didn't get hurt.

Why does the cylinder look like it's cast?
 

Buzz

Senior Member
Yeah - I seriously hope he was wearing his glasses! Send me the link via PM if you will, I'd like to follow it. That's one of the scandium cylinders, perhaps just has a different metal texture?

I saw a blown up Ruger Super Redhawk one time. Takes a huge mistake to blow one of those up! ;)
 

dawg2

AWOL ADMINISTRATOR
Whoa....I don't trust that stuff....
 
Thread starter #6

Wiskey_33

Senior Member
Yeah - I seriously hope he was wearing his glasses! Send me the link via PM if you will, I'd like to follow it. That's one of the scandium cylinders, perhaps just has a different metal texture?

I saw a blown up Ruger Super Redhawk one time. Takes a huge mistake to blow one of those up! ;)
Scandium frame/titanium cylinder per S&W website.
 
Thats the reason I do not reload anything.
All it takes is one mistake, distraction, you fill in the blank________ and I could get hurt.
 

Luke_M

Senior Member
Thats the reason I do not reload anything.
All it takes is one mistake, distraction, you fill in the blank________ and I could get hurt.
I don't reload either, but it's not because I'm afraid of myself. You consider the one mistake that you can make against an entire factory of possible mistakes.....

It's a wonder there are not more accidents then there are.
 

Buzz

Senior Member
Thats the reason I do not reload anything.
All it takes is one mistake, distraction, you fill in the blank________ and I could get hurt.
That's not really any different than driving a car, riding a bike, or using any kind of machinery. Mistakes can be deadly as can distraction.
 

GT-40 GUY

Senior Member
Many reloaders do not know that you can put a double charge in a pistol case without knowing it because it won't over flow with powder.

gt40
 

Bill Mc

Senior Member
That's why you look in your cases prioe to seating the bullets.

To check for double loads or, squib loads.
 
I bet he/she dropped a load when that baby popped!!!!YIKES:hair::hair::hair:
 

Buzz

Senior Member
According to the thread on AR15.com, he was using 27g of H110. The Hodgdon Website shows a starting load of 27.5g and a max of 28.5, but the pressure difference between the two is dramatic. That being said, it seems improbable that a half grain under the published minimum load would have caused such a dramatic case of detonation.

It would be literally impossible to double charge this load as 27g of H110 would take up a lot of powder space in a .44 Magnum case.


I bet he/she dropped a load when that baby popped!!!!YIKES
Pretty sure they will call him "Flinch" forever.
 
According to the thread on AR15.com, he was using 27g of H110. The Hodgdon Website shows a starting load of 27.5g and a max of 28.5, but the pressure difference between the two is dramatic. That being said, it seems improbable that a half grain under the published minimum load would have caused such a dramatic case of detonation.

It would be literally impossible to double charge this load as 27g of H110 would take up a lot of powder space in a .44 Magnum case.

Pretty sure they will call him "Flinch" forever.
Exactly! However...

Most people don't realize it, but you can blow a gun apart if you UNDER CHARGE a case too!!!
 
I may be wrong about this, but H110 has warnings all over it for under charging.
The below is from the Hodgdon website

"H110 and Winchester 296 loads should not be reduced more than 3%.

Reduce H110 and Winchester 296 loads 3% and work up from there. H110 and Winchester 296 if reduced too much will cause inconsistent ignition. In some cases it will lodge a bullet in the barrel, causing a hazardous situation (Barrel Obstruction). This may cause severe personal injury or death to users or bystanders. DO NOT REDUCE H110 LOADS BY MORE THAN 3%. "
 

Buzz

Senior Member
I may be wrong about this, but H110 has warnings all over it for under charging.
The below is from the Hodgdon website

"H110 and Winchester 296 loads should not be reduced more than 3%.

Reduce H110 and Winchester 296 loads 3% and work up from there. H110 and Winchester 296 if reduced too much will cause inconsistent ignition. In some cases it will lodge a bullet in the barrel, causing a hazardous situation (Barrel Obstruction). This may cause severe personal injury or death to users or bystanders. DO NOT REDUCE H110 LOADS BY MORE THAN 3%. "
You are absolutely correct. It makes me wonder if this is what happened in this case. A squib load followed by a catastrophic explosion.
 
Thread starter #20

Wiskey_33

Senior Member
You are absolutely correct. It makes me wonder if this is what happened in this case. A squib load followed by a catastrophic explosion.
He says in the link he under loaded the case.
 
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