Knife question.

Thread starter #1

Head East

Senior Member
My daughter got me this kitchen knife for my birthday. It is really nice and is pretty heavy. It is designated as a chopping knife.

I am not sure what to do with this as a kitchen knife!! I really like to have it in the camper as an outdoor knife. Chopping small branches for the camp fire... lol.

Question is, what is the purpose of a knife this heavy for use in the kitchen? Chopping up whole chickens?

Didnt want yo ask her cuz i felt she would think i didnt like it. It just seems better used outdoors. Had a nice belt sheath that came with it.

Idk...thoughts?
 

Attachments

Thread starter #2

Head East

Senior Member
Thought to add, feels like taking a sledge hammer to a piece if celery... lol.
 

pacecars

Senior Member
Maybe get a kind of “rolling” chop going
 
Thread starter #4

Head East

Senior Member
Ok...im just doin it rong!! Thx!
 
Thread starter #6

Head East

Senior Member
I aint much if a chef mr nick. LoL, thx for your confidence tho!!! maybe thats why i am struggling with it, Im more just a cook.
 
Your daughter must have thought that you spend a lot of time in the kitchen cooking if she thought you needed a sheath knife for the job.

And then - whole chickens should not be chopped. I don't know exactly when people seem to have lost the knowledge of how to cut up a chicken but they must have. Absolutely no chopping is required to do it properly.
 

Anvil Head

Senior Member
In all my years as a custom knifemaker/bladesmith I've not seen that particular style composition blade geometry labeled a kitchen knife and would not consider it such. I have noticed that a lot of "new" makers just call a finished knife what the customer wants to think it is.
In my opinion it is way too thick in the spine and too steep a bevel for any kind of reasonable slicing/dicing kitchen activity. Slicing/dicing does not require a thick blade to work efficiently of effectively. Edge geometry makes all the difference in how a knife performs it's task. Sure, most of us knife users can make do with just about any blade, but certain blade geometries just work better for their intended application. That's why there are so many different types/designs out there.

Not saying your daughter chose poorly, but that whoever told her it was a "kitchen" knife was not accurate in their nomenclature. There is enough steel in that blade for a reasonably skilled bladesmith to have forged two large well purposed "kitchen" style utility or chef's knives with steel left over.
The overall construction and finish are well done - not sub-quality work at all. Just better for task non-kitchen oriented.
I think you have found it's true calling as a "camp" knife that can be used for multiple task, just not the best design for a working kitchen/chef's knife.
 

gunnurse

Senior Member
Just receive the blessing of a daughter that loves you and put it on a display stand in your kitchen. Just feel happy that it was a knife just like that that hewed the memories that makes your daughter love you so much that made her choose of that particular knife. Our children can’t choose parents. It looks like if she could have, she would have chosen you.
 
Thread starter #10

Head East

Senior Member
Your daughter must have thought that you spend a lot of time in the kitchen cooking if she thought you needed a sheath knife for the job.

And then - whole chickens should not be chopped. I don't know exactly when people seem to have lost the knowledge of how to cut up a chicken but they must have. Absolutely no chopping is required to do it properly.
I got ya, just a bit of sarcasm. 😂 I do cook a fair amount... I have cut up my share if chickens, and the knife doesnt look like this.
 
Thread starter #11

Head East

Senior Member
In all my years as a custom knifemaker/bladesmith I've not seen that particular style composition blade geometry labeled a kitchen knife and would not consider it such. I have noticed that a lot of "new" makers just call a finished knife what the customer wants to think it is.
In my opinion it is way too thick in the spine and too steep a bevel for any kind of reasonable slicing/dicing kitchen activity. Slicing/dicing does not require a thick blade to work efficiently of effectively. Edge geometry makes all the difference in how a knife performs it's task. Sure, most of us knife users can make do with just about any blade, but certain blade geometries just work better for their intended application. That's why there are so many different types/designs out there.

Not saying your daughter chose poorly, but that whoever told her it was a "kitchen" knife was not accurate in their nomenclature. There is enough steel in that blade for a reasonably skilled bladesmith to have forged two large well purposed "kitchen" style utility or chef's knives with steel left over.
The overall construction and finish are well done - not sub-quality work at all. Just better for task non-kitchen oriented.
I think you have found it's true calling as a "camp" knife that can be used for multiple task, just not the best design for a working kitchen/chef's knife.
It is a heavy knife. As you mentioned, the width on the spine is really wide and its a very odd bevel for slicing something. It does seem well made, no doubt, but i just cant figure out what the intent is. I am using it and it will be a permanent part in my camping experience.

Thanks for your input.
 
Thread starter #12

Head East

Senior Member
Just receive the blessing of a daughter that loves you and put it on a display stand in your kitchen. Just feel happy that it was a knife just like that that hewed the memories that makes your daughter love you so much that made her choose of that particular knife. Our children can’t choose parents. It looks like if she could have, she would have chosen you.
Thanks, she is really close with me and i am fortunate father to have her, as i am with all the kids. She will be happy i use it regularly; although it will be in the camp kitchen!
Thx gunny.
 
Altomino Hand-Forged Chopping Knife. (European, not cheap either).
Looks like a rounded belly Cleaver, kinda like a straight version of my brush clearing Kukri.
 
Thread starter #14

Head East

Senior Member
Altomino Hand-Forged Chopping Knife. (European, not cheap either).
Looks like a rounded belly Cleaver, kinda like a straight version of my brush clearing Kukri.
😳
 

gunnurse

Senior Member
I just saw a YouTube video where a Taiwanese guy disassembled a 600-pound tuna with a knife that looked very similar. Got any tunas laying around?
 
Thread starter #17

Head East

Senior Member
It doesn’t dissect a ribeye all that well, but I ain’t tiwaneez. :p
 
Top