Let the .41 mag talk

Mr. Miner,
I appreciate the information you have provided. Please continue.
Thank you, I got my first .44 Ruger in 1956 so revolver work took many, many years. I am happy to pass on anything to help no matter how big or small. My love for revolvers has never stopped and I want all of you to get the best no matter what one you have. It matters not a thing to me what you prefer as long as you have fun.
 
Gas checks??? What are they for? false stories abound like "they keep the base from melting." Or they let you shoot soft lead." Look at it my way, A cast bullet will skid the rifling, No if's and's or buts. If the skid passes the base it opens channels for gas to erode the lead resulting in a leaded gun.
A gas check is a skid stop and will force the bullet to spin,
closing the gas path. Recovered bullets still show skid but it stops before the base because my bullets are hard. Too soft and the skid passes the check and leads the check and bore. Then with a leaded bore the check can't wipe out lead, it rides over it packing it tighter. I have found no need for a check if the skid stops early.
The worst ever are the dead soft .38's that squirt lead out of the gap and even lead the outside of a revolver.
 
More on gas checks. I make my molds for a tight fit and to keep the base perpendicular to the bullet I run an end mill across the top lightly once in the vise, before I lay out the cavities and center the cherry. I have to tap the checks on my bench to seat. Now to size, if you have an RCBS or Lyman sizer, you are good to go. But I like the Lee push through because to fit to a revolver I can buy a smaller die and lap to what I need. They can be problematic with checks. Do not use the Alox that comes with them, save it up and undercoat your car because all it is is Zeebart.
I lube by hand or pan lube and the best is if you have a flat nose bullet, center the nose on the punch and run through gas check first.
Sizing a bullet takes thought. Some say weird stuff like size to the throats so what if your cast is smaller to start? So you might think a larger sizer will work---NOT SO! NEVER size with a die larger then the bullet diameter, PERIOD. Here is the problem, the gas check will be larger then the bullet so when you seat in the case, the check will open the brass so you will lose all case tension.
Next I will tell you all how to cast perfect bullets so no. 1 until you empty a 20# pot you will have not have a single reject. Maybe tomorrow, later guys.
 
Bullet design has been a problem having tested about all molds sold. I seen all kinds of drawings on paper but none appeal. so I cut the cherry as I go. Mistakes have been made of course like my 30-30 bullet that came out at 193 gr with a long bore ride that is not supposed to work in a micro groove. I got off on diameter so the nose has to be sized first to .301" then the rest at .311". Crazy thing does 3/4" at 100.
Then I found most revolver bullets with one wide GG do not shoot good except for the original Keith 429421. Back in the day I could bust rocks off hand on a RR bank at better then 400 yards but Lyman kept altering the molds and those cut with a re sharpened cherry are too small.
Then my .475 bullet with 2 GG's left a base drive band at .080". I was worried until I shot them to get amazing accuracy so I copied it for the .500 JRH to get at times an inch at 100. I sent some to a fellow and he changed it to have a mold made and those he sent me did not work as good.
I cast two mornings and made .357, pure round balls, Maxi balls and 30-30, about 300 total with out a reject. Weight varies 4 tenths of a grain.
I will get into casting soon, my computer had the blue screen of death this morning so I just got online.
 
Shooting long range with open sights is a challenge. The rear sight and front sight picture is different. When you elevate the barrel you will see the barrel through the rear sight. Put masking tape on the barrel and move it back until you get the edge of the tape at the sight. Then put the front sight on the target. Adjust the tape until you hit. You can also get used to how much barrel shows.
 

Newt2

Senior Member
Shooting long range with open sights is a challenge. The rear sight and front sight picture is different. When you elevate the barrel you will see the barrel through the rear sight. Put masking tape on the barrel and move it back until you get the edge of the tape at the sight. Then put the front sight on the target. Adjust the tape until you hit. You can also get used to how much barrel shows.
I don't fully understand that, but I have used iron sights out to 85 yards with great success.
 
I don't fully understand that, but I have used iron sights out to 85 yards with great success.
I am talking about out to 400 to 500 yards. Bullet drop is amazing so the barrel is elevated to the point sights are useless. Your revolvers will shoot that far and even a nine can reach 1000 yards but you need to know how high to aim. If your barrel is long you can reference the rear sight at a spot on the barrel and use the front sight on the target, beyond that and a tall tree top beyond the target might be needed.
I use an Ultra Dot on my revolvers for deer so there is not much adjustment. By aiming at a tree branch above the steel I shot 5 shots into 2-1/2" at 500 meters with my BFR in 45-70. I can only guess as to drop but in the neighborhood of 30 to 32 feet. My spotter walked me in.
The 45-70 revolver with a 10" barrel is ridiculous to make shoot and only one powder works, SR4759 so I bought a bunch when it was discontinued. I shoot my cast bullets. It is super, great fun to shoot far. I can't even touch that accuracy with my 45-70 rifle. If you have the space, do it for fun. My normal shooting distance is 100 yards.
 

Newt2

Senior Member
I am talking about out to 400 to 500 yards.
A handgun shot at that distance is ridiculous and creates wounded game that is not humane. Bullet performance even from a BFR is questionable at those ranges.

I am a practical person, but do know my and firearm limitations. You do provide good information, but I believe you stretch things a bit. You joined and jumped right into the .41 magnum talk thread. Maybe you should create a new thread "Personal Experiences with Handguns".

Sorry, but being perfect in every way only raises questions in my mind.
 
You take me wrong, long range is just for fun targets. My revolver hunting is at bow ranges. Sorry if I offend you for trying to share what I have learned through years of work. This stuff did not come easy but maybe you know more so I guess I will quit passing on 68 years of knowledge, since I am near 84 and think a .41 can sit up and talk.
I will not post any more unless others ask.
Seems every site has someone like you so maybe you have some words of wisdom to share. I bet 7 yards is far for you!
 

Newt2

Senior Member
Getting back to the 'let the 41 mag talk,' the first handgun I ever owned was a Ruger Blackhawk 6.5 inch .41 Magnum. My first shot popped a soup can at 40 yards. I bought it 3 weeks before hunting season so I jokingly said, "Well, I'm all set."

That's when I started reloading. I acquired a press and dies, powder, primers and a variety of projectiles. I even got a chronograph and conducted expansion tests.

I took over 20 deer with that gun and yes, all were under 50 yards. That's when I found the art of still hunting and stalking. I really enjoyed moving stealthily through the woods, spotting a suitable buck and then stalking him until I had a good clear shot. The results of those were outstanding. One shot stops at ranges from 6 FEET to 25 yards.

Reloading I developed what I call my "woodchuck" load. It was a 170 gr Sierra JHC that went over 1700 fps out of that gun. The performance of that load was simply explosive.

Then the thoughts of bear hunting came in. More on that later.
 
Getting back to the 'let the 41 mag talk,' the first handgun I ever owned was a Ruger Blackhawk 6.5 inch .41 Magnum. My first shot popped a soup can at 40 yards. I bought it 3 weeks before hunting season so I jokingly said, "Well, I'm all set."

That's when I started reloading. I acquired a press and dies, powder, primers and a variety of projectiles. I even got a chronograph and conducted expansion tests.

I took over 20 deer with that gun and yes, all were under 50 yards. That's when I found the art of still hunting and stalking. I really enjoyed moving stealthily through the woods, spotting a suitable buck and then stalking him until I had a good clear shot. The results of those were outstanding. One shot stops at ranges from 6 FEET to 25 yards.

Reloading I developed what I call my "woodchuck" load. It was a 170 gr Sierra JHC that went over 1700 fps out of that gun. The performance of that load was simply explosive.

Then the thoughts of bear hunting came in. More on that later.
Yes, very good. There is hunting and there is shooting. I get upset with those that are shooting game at stupid ranges with the 6.5's, etc. I prefer 20 yards or even less. You are a good hunter in my book.
Yet as I said, nothing wrong with stretching the gun way out there on steel targets or rocks.
I hope some are interested in me posting more, I have a lot of stuff left.
 
I hope both of you keep posting. Lots of handgun experience speaking here. Thanks.
OK, a little more for you. Gun grip and how. All handguns should be held firm, just short of shakes. Some do better held high, closer to bore line. Others like the SA hog leg should be held lower and never, ever let the gun "roll" or if the web of your hand meets the hammer you will feel it. Those I knew who did split their heads and blackened eyes. I tuck my little finger under the grip. Rubber grips like the Signature that fill behind the trigger guard are needed a lot. One guy would cut his trigger finger on the front of the guard and bash his knuckle on the rear. Big, strong guy too so I asked why not hold it tighter?
I hate the Bisley as my knuckle is large from heavy bows. a modified Bisley is better. Under recoil, just let the gun raise your arm, best buffer made.
 
Those I knew who did split their heads and blackened eyes
I have to laugh. I had a friend that wanted to shoot my TC Contender in 444 Marlin. My only suggestion was to lock his elbow so the recoil pushed the gun over his head. It was alright until just before he pulled the trigger, I noticed his elbow go limp. 4 stitches later...
 
My friend shot my revolver and was the laughing stock at work for a long time. Said he likes to hold guns loose. Caliber doesn't matter either, I have shot those featherweight .357,s that are not pleasant. I like long barrels for hunting as there is more weight and the muzzle blast is farther away.
 
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