Long term study about coyote effects on deer populations

Thread starter #141
Coyotes Settle the South by John Lane and printed by UGA Press is an interesting read of science and anecdotal stories of the Coyote in the South. One interesting point was a study at the SRP (Bomb Plant) where federal game biologists removed over 500 coyotes from a large area. Pregnant does were captured and implanted with vaginal transmitters that would activate when the fawn was born. Biologists moved quickly to the site and more often than not, evidence that the fawn was killed and eaten by coyotes with dna evidence substantiating coyote presence at the kill. There was no reduction in kills the following year after the 500 were trapped and killed. Another point was made that nature allows the coyote litter to be increased or reduced by the population present. To establish population levels, the response of calls at night to the females calls, lets her know just how many are in the area. The litters can vary from a few pups to 20. Coyotes are omnivores and will eat fallen fruit, typically from a pear or apple tree. And has been noted in another thread on here (maybe elsewhere) that coyotes will often get drunk as goats on fermenting fruit. They are smart and resourceful,and apparently will take a drink every now and then. They can't be all bad. ;) Gil
Yotes love persimmons, also. And you are correct, the more of them you kill, the faster they breed.
 
Here's an interesting article on the genetic saga of coyote/red wolf/gray wolf.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK542544/
You are the man! Thanks!!
Being a nerd and new, I’m just trying to learn as much as I can. Nothing beats time in the woods, thisI know, but I’m not Expecting to get a surplus of that with a new little human due in July. thank you!! The only conservation research I’m involved with is on trout, and even that’s not real trout, hooch tail water trouts. So these links are really awesome.
 
One of the funniest experiences i ever had with a coyote - I was muzzleloader hunting near two big persimmon trees that were dropping. A good sized yote came in and scooped up every persimmon he could. Then, with no more persimmons on the ground, he sat on his haunches and looked up at the tree whining for about a half hour, hoping a few more would fall. I couldn't bring myself to shoot him!
 

bany

Senior Member
That was actually a really biased study that article was based on, I'm surprised it ever made it through peer review. The study fails to acknowledge that state agencies had to reduce doe harvest to combat declining fawn recruitment rates.
I didn’t care for the article much. I think you’re correct. I haven’t killed a doe in years, I didn’t spend a lot of time hunting my Georgia spot this year but the coyotes were not around me. The last couple years killing coyotes took precedence over getting a deer. Previously I saw the deer (parts) coyotes killed. I’m confident us pressuring (killing) them played a role in them at least avoiding the area. Still have rabbits and squirrels, not sure how the neighbors pets are doing.
 

antharper

“Well Rounded Outdoorsman MOD “
In all honesty I think the property I hunt and just spend a lot of time on in general is overpopulated with predators , mainly raccoons and coyotes , very few possums, fox or bobcats and I’m in the woods on this land a lot not just during hunting season and every step I take I’m looking at tracks and I know what I’m seeing , only 3 of us hunt it and we kill a few coyotes every deer and turkey season and have caught a few coons around our feeders but not enough to really notice , and I’ve been thinking about trapping for the past couple years and after seeing on multiple occasions this past deer season coyotes stalking deer and running them off I decided something needed to be done , and not really knowing what I was doing I bought me some trapping supplies and caught 5 coyotes and 13 raccoons in 10 days I think , and am planning on keeping after them for a year or 2 just to see what difference I can make , and I’m not doing it for fun , even though I do really enjoy it , I don’t take killing any animal lightly, even these stinking pigs everyone hates !
 
In all honesty I think the property I hunt and just spend a lot of time on in general is overpopulated with predators , mainly raccoons and coyotes , very few possums, fox or bobcats and I’m in the woods on this land a lot not just during hunting season and every step I take I’m looking at tracks and I know what I’m seeing , only 3 of us hunt it and we kill a few coyotes every deer and turkey season and have caught a few coons around our feeders but not enough to really notice , and I’ve been thinking about trapping for the past couple years and after seeing on multiple occasions this past deer season coyotes stalking deer and running them off I decided something needed to be done , and not really knowing what I was doing I bought me some trapping supplies and caught 5 coyotes and 13 raccoons in 10 days I think , and am planning on keeping after them for a year or 2 just to see what difference I can make , and I’m not doing it for fun , even though I do really enjoy it , I don’t take killing any animal lightly, even these stinking pigs everyone hates !
Man, longest sentence that I’ve ever read. Congrats! Haha
 
Coyote, hybrid or red wolf?
I don’t get as technical as some here about “hybrids”. To me a true hybrid would be if you had a Liger or a mule on camera. Two different species all together. A dog is a dog is a dog. We’re really just talking suttle differences with the coyote, wolf, dog, coydog, coywolf, etc. If that thing pictured would stand for it, your standard poodle could breed it. The offspring would be 100% sexually viable. Just like “hybrid” turkeys. Subspecies is mainly appearance based in this case with some obvious behavioral markers.
 
Thread starter #153
Coyote, hybrid or red wolf?
Pretty much all our eastern coyotes are hybrid wild canids with varying amount of genetic mixing. They are quite different from western coyotes. It doesn’t really matter what they are, just what niche they fill. Most places on earth have a midsize canine predator. Red wolf, coyote, jackal, dingo, African wild dog, dhole, maned wolf, whatever. There’s an ecological niche they fill worldwide.
 
Pretty much all our eastern coyotes are hybrid wild canids with varying amount of genetic mixing. They are quite different from western coyotes. It doesn’t really matter what they are, just what niche they fill. Most places on earth have a midsize canine predator. Red wolf, coyote, jackal, dingo, African wild dog, dhole, maned wolf, whatever. There’s an ecological niche they fill worldwide.
I had never heard that coyotes don’t come in a black color phase.
We have several running around out place and fairly good size ones as well, you can even see that pup in the pic I posted.
Thanks! Good info!
 
Thread starter #155
I had never heard that coyotes don’t come in a black color phase.
We have several running around out place and fairly good size ones as well, you can even see that pup in the pic I posted.
Thanks! Good info!
Yeah, all the classic western pure coyotes are gray as far as I know. The black and red and blonde color phases we have come from wolf and/or dog DNA, which several studies show to be in pretty much all of our eastern yotes. They seem much more pack-oriented than pure coyotes too, and are much, much larger on average than western yotes.
 

GLS

Classic Southern Gentleman
Incidentally one of the lead biologists involved in the SRP ("Bomb Plant") coyote-fawn study was the son of the late James Kilgo who was the author of Deep Enough for Ivory Bills.
A farmer buddy won't allow coyotes to be killed on his property. He loses too much money due to deer predation of his crops.

Gil
 

Jim Boyd

Senior Member
A farmer buddy won't allow coyotes to be killed on his property. He loses too much money due to deer predation of his crops.
Gil
This, in essence, tells you how effective they are.

Invasive species and we shoot them.

Harder as a 100% archery hunter but my intent is there.
 
I've killed a black coyote here in Northwest Georgia, and 3 more besides mine have been taken on the same land in the last 3 years.
A Thermal Imaging Scope doesn't care one little bit about what color they are in the cow pasture at night. The black ones get the same 62gr. Lehigh Defense Controlled Chaos Bullet that the gray ones do... usually, they're absolutely D.R.T., just like a bank safe was dropped on their head when that little screamin' pill hits them...
 
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