MATTHEW 24 AND 25

Banjo Picker

Senior Member
RAPTURE OR DESTRUCTION (Mt. 24:40-42).

These Scriptures are some of misunderstood in Scripture to many people because they interpret them in connection with the rapture instead of the second advent. It is quite clear that the context that the rapture is not referred to at all in Mt. 24-25. Therefore, regardless of how much these verses sound like the rapture of the church they could not refer to that event. They refer to the literal coming of Christ to destroy the ungodly similar to the flood as is made clear by the use of the word "then." Then [at the coming of Christ with the saints to end wickedness as did the flood] shall two be in the field; the one shall be taken and the other left . . . Watch therefore; for ye know not what hour your Lord doth come.
 

Banjo Picker

Senior Member
Why should we take these verses out of there proper setting which is at the coming of Christ with the saints, and make them refer to the coming of Christ for the saints? Why do we have to use this passage to prove that there will be a rapture or that some will be raptured from different parts of the Earth, and some will be left? There are plenty of Scriptures to prove a rapture of some from the world besides this one. Therefore, why should we base a doctrine upon a passage that does not concern the subject? If then these verses refer to the literal coming of Christ, what do they mean? Where are these persons who will be taken? These questions are fully answered in the following passages which show that these verses refer to the destruction of some and the preservation of others at the Battle of Armageddon.

In Luke 17:34-37 we have a parallel passage to Matt. 24:40-42 which further proves that both refer to the coming of Christ to the Earth, and not to the rapture. The verses in Luke are the conclusion of a discourse concerning "the day when the Son of man is revealed" when two shall be here, and two there, the one shall be taken and the other left. This was a new teaching to the disciples, and they asked, "Where, Lord? that is, they wanted to know where they were to be taken. The answer was, "Wheresoever the body is, thither will the eagles be gathered together." These statement in both Matthew and Luke are fulfilled at the coming of Christ to the Earth, and not at the rapture of the church. The Greek for body is soma meaning a corpse. The Greek for carcase is ptoma meaning a body fallen in death, a dead carcase. Both Matthew and Luke use the same Greek word for eagles, aetoi, meaning the natural birds of the heavens (Rev. 4:7; 12:14). Thus if the passages were dealing with the rapture we would have Christ pictured as a dead carcase or corpse and the saints pictured as living beings caught up to dead carcass. This is beyond human conception for neither Christ nor the saints are pictured in such a manner in the Bible.
 

Banjo Picker

Senior Member
Matt. 24:40-42 refers to the Battle of Armageddon when the angel will stand in the sun crying for the fowls to be gathered to eat the carcass of men who have been slain by Christ and His armies at His coming, and who have previously been gathered to the battle, one from here and one from there (Rev. 19:17-21; Ezek. 39:17-21). This picture of the eagles being gathered to eat the slain on the battlefield was a familiar one to the disciples. It is clearly described in Job 39:27-30. The mobilization of the hosts at Armageddon where they will meet death and make the supper for the fowls and beasts is pictured in Ezek. 38-39; Joel 3; Zech. 14; Rev. 16:13-16; 19:11-21. After this battle the carcasses of the hosts will lie all over the mountains of Palestine (Ezek. 38:16; 39:2-5, 17-21), making a great feast as described in the above passages, "For wheresoever the carcase is there will the eagles be gathered together.

This destruction is compared to the destruction at the time of the flood. Even as the flood came and "took them all away" (destroyed them, Luke 17:27), so shall also the coming of the Son of man take some away and leave others to enter the Millennium (Zech. 14:16-21; 2 Thess. 1:7-10; Jude 14). After stating that this destruction is to be like the flood, Jesus again emphasized the fact that no man would know the day nor the hour of His coming and warned all men at the end of the age to "watch."
 

Banjo Picker

Senior Member
THE PARABLE OF THE FIG TREE (Mt. 24:32, 33)

This parable is commonly interpreted as applying to the Jewish nation and its restoration, but this could not be the truth illustrated by this parable. The restoration of Israel was not inquired of by the disciples, and therefore, could not be the subject Jesus intended to illustrate by the fig tree parable.

This is just a simple illustration of the nearness of Christ's second advent, which is the subject of Matt. 24-25. "Now learn a parable [illustration] of the fig tree [Luke adds "and all the trees," 21:29]; when his branch is yet tender and putteth forth leaves ye know [what?] that summer is nigh: SO LIKEWISE ye, when ye shall see ALL THESE THINGS [the above signs of Christ's coming of Mt. 24>4-26], know that it [the second advent, not the restoration of Israel] is near, even at the doors" (Mt. 24:32, 33). What could be clear? One does not have to use this parable for the basis of the doctrine of the restoration of Israel, for there are many plain passages that cover that doctrine satisfactorily. Then too that all of Matt. 24:4-26 is fulfilled in one generation is further evident from this parable of the fig tree, for no tree puts forth leaves throughout the season.

In Mt. 24:34, 35 we have the infallibility of the above truths stated. Heaven and Earth shall be changed, but these truths shall not be changed (Lk. 16:16; Heb. 1:10-12). The Greek word for pass away in this passage means pass from one state to another and not cessation of existence, as proved in 2 Cor. 5:17 and other passages. The Heaven and the Earth will never be annihilated.
 

Banjo Picker

Senior Member
PARABLE OF THE GOOD MAN OF THE HOUSE (Mt. 24:43-44)

Jesus here illustrates the need for readiness in view of His return to the Earth at an unpredictable time, so that each individual will escape the "sudden destruction" that will overtake those who are not ready. Again, He emphasizes the fact that no man will know the day or the hour. The purpose of not revealing the day or the hour is to keep the disciples ready all the time to meet the Lord when He comes.
 

Banjo Picker

Senior Member
PARABLE OF FAITHFUL AND EVIL SERVANTS (Matt. 24:45-51)

This parable begins by the words "Who then" that is, in view of the suddenness of Christ's coming at a time unexpected, who will not be faithful in the things that have been committed to him during the absence of the Lord? This parable illustrates faithfulness in view of the coming of Christ to the Earth who will judge everyone according to the deeds done in the body. This judgment is the same as the judgment of the nations of Matt.25:31-46. it is not the same as the judgment of the saints before the return of Christ.
 
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