Mountain trout late season

Thread starter #1
Hello everyone, hope all is well.

I plan on taking a 6, or 7 day trout fishing/primitive camping trip in a couple days.

Disclaimer: I am not an experienced trout fisherman.
I've caught trout in Kentucky, and northern Tennessee long time ago a few times.
We just used panther martins, and small skinny rapala crankbaits on 6lb mono, with a short leader of 4lb on ultralight spinning tackle.
I understand creek fishing; as far as where to cast depending on the particular situation.
This is the extent of my trout fishing knowledge.

That being said...

I've narrowed my focus to the higher elevations East/Northeast of Clayton, Chattahoochee national forest.
I've never visited this area. I planned on just riding around; till I found a good spot to walk in.

I was wondering if someone would be willing to share some possible lure/bait selection options for that particular area.
I've never finished for trout in Georgia.
Lived here my whole life (Minus about 5 years.), and I'm ashamed to say I have not been on a proper camping trip in our northern mountains.

I plan on bringing an ultralite spinning set up.
The line, and lures/bait I've yet to purchase. Everything I have at the moment; is for Bass, and Cats.

I pride myself in finding information myself, so I don't have to bother anyone.
There's not much specific information available for fishing this area (I do realize it's possibly because folks who know; don't necessarily want EVERYONE to know EVERYTHING that may have possibly taken years to learn by experience about an area.).

So a couple questions, if someone could kindly point me in the right direction.
$ is an object for me right now.

What lures/bait (Particular hook, weight, bobber combination for live bait if suggested.) should I focus on?

Appropriate line weight(s)?
Possibly different line weights for different lure/bait setups?

I planned on going in no more than about 3 miles for camp (I wouldn't be against going half a mile, or less.)
Does this limit my chances to be away from most folks in the national forest?
Is there a suggestion for an area that has a good chance of being void of humans?
I don't really need a full lecture on general camping, or animal safety; however I am open to hearing any specific dangers about this area that I might not know about.

Thank you in advance,
 

Dana Young

Senior Member
I use a # 12 hook baited with artificial worm such as the Berkly trout worms and a bb split shot set to the depth of the creek between 4 to 6 inches deep. good luck. also most of the creeks are not stocked far off the main road
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
4#-6# line, Blue Fox Vibrax #1 spinner with gold blade and no dressing on the treble or #1 Mepps Aglia gold, plain treble. Cut the red plastic sleeve off the hook. Nothing you can fish with will outfish those.
 
Thread starter #6
I use a # 12 hook baited with artificial worm such as the Berkly trout worms and a bb split shot set to the depth of the creek between 4 to 6 inches deep. good luck. also most of the creeks are not stocked far off the main road

Thank you for the information!
I'm ok with less stocking.

Would be happy with a few brookies; in the more remote areas.
 
Thread starter #7
4#-6# line, Blue Fox Vibrax #1 spinner with gold blade and no dressing on the treble or #1 Mepps Aglia gold, plain treble. Cut the red plastic sleeve off the hook. Nothing you can fish with will outfish those.
Bubba, thank you!
This is more than I could've hope for.

Definitely going in the shopping cart.

Your information fills me with confidence.
 

Big7

Senior Member
4#-6# line, Blue Fox Vibrax #1 spinner with gold blade and no dressing on the treble or #1 Mepps Aglia gold, plain treble. Cut the red plastic sleeve off the hook. Nothing you can fish with will outfish those.
Blue Fox will catch anything. 😁
 

Big7

Senior Member
Small Rooster Tails will wear trout slap out. 😉
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
Small Rooster Tails will wear trout slap out. 😉
Rooster tails, not so much. Too light, won't sink in current, don't spin good. I can catch ten on a Blue Fox or Mepps for every one on a Rooster Tail.
 

Big7

Senior Member
Rooster tails, not so much. Too light, won't sink in current, don't spin good. I can catch ten on a Blue Fox or Mepps for every one on a Rooster Tail.
I love Blue Fox.
Also caught a bunch on Roosters.
I'm not scared to throw them in undercuts or anything else. Sooooo many colors. Cheaper too.
And... I know they are not as high quality as they were 30 years ago, but still.

So. What's up with not spinning? Never had a problem after a quick jerk to get started.
Granted, I fish rivers, not streams.

Side note: a bag of them would be my first choice if throw out somewhere and had to survive. :wink:
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
I love Blue Fox.
Also caught a bunch on Roosters.
I'm not scared to throw them in undercuts or anything else. Sooooo many colors. Cheaper too.
And... I know they are not as high quality as they were 30 years ago, but still.

So. What's up with not spinning? Never had a problem after a quick jerk to get started.
Granted, I fish rivers, not streams.

Side note: a bag of them would be my first choice if throw out somewhere and had to survive. :wink:
A real spinner doesn't need a jerk to get started. And a RT will not sink to the bottom of the hole, where most of the fish are. They'll catch some fish, but not like the others. Your mileage may vary, but I've spent thousands of hours over the years dragging spinners through trout streams, and that's just my experience. I prefer Rooster Tails for bass and white bass instead of trout in moving water.
 
Thread starter #13
Thank y'all do much for the replies!

It definitely wasn't my intention to start a best trout lure debate, however I really appreciate all the information.
 
Regarding your other questions ... if yer fishing within the Chattahoochee National Forest UDAP or another brand of bear spray would be prudent to have on your person, ideally chest level at the ready. Much of this National Forest you might fish in is a Georgia WMA and so carrying a firearm outside of hunting season without a hunting license could land you in a bind. If you carry for protection be aware of this and be discreet.

If you are wanting to be away from people you are going to have to hike a bit. Essentially any water near a road has people. Day visitors to full timers. I was amazed at the setups some have in the forest. I definitely got the impression some camps were not following the 14 day maximum then move on rule. (I think it is 14 days) The weekends will be choked full of people, much less during the week.

Big spray, rain gear, first aid kit, water purifier, snake jook, etc.are all excellent inclusions to take with you. There is some gorgeous scenery to bask in up in that forest. Enjoy your time. Oh and pay attention to the radar - the rain can dump a lot and raise the water levels quickly.
 

Big7

Senior Member
Thank y'all do much for the replies!

It definitely wasn't my intention to start a best trout lure debate, however I really appreciate all the information.
I know.
Thought my first post was complementary, along with a side joke. Hence the ::ke: emoji. 😁

The backstory: There was a store near Buford Dam called, interestingly enough, "The Dam Store".

They sold 5 - 7 in trout for striper bait.
It was a running joke back in the old days.

I like to Trout fish as much as the next guy.
 
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Much of this National Forest you might fish in is a Georgia WMA and so carrying a firearm outside of hunting season without a hunting license could land you in a bind. If you carry for protection be aware of this and be discreet.
The Chattahoochee National Forest follows Georgia state law. WMAs used to have different regulations--as stated you couldn't carry except during hunting season. A law was passed some years ago allowing carry on WMAs outside hunting season as long as you follow state law. In other words you need a carry permit.

With a carry permit you'll be fine in any case. Don't carry into any govt. buildings on the Forest or WMA, but that's the case anyway.

All this is on the CNF and DNR websites.
 
Go on weekdays, way too crowded up there on Weekends, all those streams in area you spoke of are stocked on the same day, the best areas are close to road, like Greg said, went up there a few weeks ago just 2 or 3 on bait , switched to Mepps Agila gold blade caught two limits...4lb or even 2lb if water is clear, a lil dirty 6 is fine
 
Rooster tails, not so much. Too light, won't sink in current, don't spin good. I can catch ten on a Blue Fox or Mepps for every one on a Rooster Tail.
How does the Blue Fox act when it comes to line twist?
The rooster tails don't give grief in that department...how about Blue Fox?
Just askin'
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
How does the Blue Fox act when it comes to line twist?
The rooster tails don't give grief in that department...how about Blue Fox?
Just askin'
Been fishing them for nearly 40 years, and never had a single issue with it that I can remember.
 
Been fishing them for nearly 40 years, and never had a single issue with it that I can remember.
Sounds good to me.....(and I'm a long time rooster tail thrower)
Looks like I'll be picking up a few of the Blue Fox and start chunking them.
Good information you posted here.
TY
(y)(y)
 
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