Mushroom Time

GLS

Classic Southern Gentleman
I froze a small chant this afternoon for about an hour and laid it out to thaw. It gave off a lot of water and was soft. But that's also what happens when you cook one or dehydrate it. Dunno if it changes flavor by freezing raw. Might be worth checking out, but a pound of raw mushrooms takes up a lot of space which is reason enough for me to freeze them after cooking and vacuum bagging. I know that method works... Sometimes a lot of what we read is based on someone else saying it will or won't work and it gets repeated in an endless loop. Sometimes, not all the time. Has anyone here tried freezing raw and then cooked them? Sorta like "never wash" wild mushrooms. During this time of plenty experimenting might be beneficial. Gil
 

Batjack

🥃 Cap`n Jack 🥃
I wish one of Y'all "shroon" folks was close to me. I've got what I think are cinnibars all over my place and just saw a patch of possibly chants in the corner of my back yard. I ain't touch'n nothing tho until as Nick says "Someone that knows puts hands on them."
 

oldways

Senior Member
I dehydrated some last year to use during winter they did good for me. I have already dried a gallon and half this year.
I wish one of Y'all "shroon" folks was close to me. I've got what I think are cinnibars all over my place and just saw a patch of possibly chants in the corner of my back yard. I ain't touch'n nothing tho until as Nick says "Someone that knows puts hands on them."
Where you be
 

Batjack

🥃 Cap`n Jack 🥃
I dehydrated some last year to use during winter they did good for me. I have already dried a gallon and half this year.

Where you be
On the Cobb / Paulding Co. line.
 

Whitefeather

Management Material
I downloaded the plantid app and it says this is a Golden Chantrelle. What do the experts say? B6109B7B-6997-4F28-A5B6-7241289BD9CE.png
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
I froze a small chant this afternoon for about an hour and laid it out to thaw. It gave off a lot of water and was soft. But that's also what happens when you cook one or dehydrate it. Dunno if it changes flavor by freezing raw. Might be worth checking out, but a pound of raw mushrooms takes up a lot of space which is reason enough for me to freeze them after cooking and vacuum bagging. I know that method works... Sometimes a lot of what we read is based on someone else saying it will or won't work and it gets repeated in an endless loop. Sometimes, not all the time. Has anyone here tried freezing raw and then cooked them? Sorta like "never wash" wild mushrooms. During this time of plenty experimenting might be beneficial. Gil
I've never been happy with freezing them raw. The method you described of sauteeing and vac-sealing is what I do. I also have never been happy with dehydrated chants. Drying works great with morels and boletes, but not with chants, IMO.
 
I wish one of Y'all "shroon" folks was close to me. I've got what I think are cinnibars all over my place and just saw a patch of possibly chants in the corner of my back yard. I ain't touch'n nothing tho until as Nick says "Someone that knows puts hands on them."
Post pictures. Chants and Cinnabars are very easily identified.
 
Leave the “roots” in the ground next time. Cut em with a knife instead of pulling them out of the ground. Cleaner and maybe they’ll be back next year.
That's actually the opposite for chanterelles.

https://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/gtr576.pdf

A study on the Bull Run Watershed by the Oregon Mycological Society, however, determined that harvesting did not reduce mushroom production, although cut patches had a slight reduction compared to patches where the mushrooms were plucked and controlled.

Thirteen years of data provide no evidence that plucking chanterelles has suppressed fruiting; indeed, the data suggest a slight stimulation of fruiting. Until 1999, no statistical correlation was noted between chanterelle productivity and harvest method, but since then a slight depression of chanterelle biomass and abundance has been detected in the “cut” plots relative to the pluck and control plots.

I always pull then cut the dirt off. Keeps mushroom clean and less gritty.
 

GLS

Classic Southern Gentleman
I've never been happy with freezing them raw. The method you described of sauteeing and vac-sealing is what I do. I also have never been happy with dehydrated chants. Drying works great with morels and boletes, but not with chants, IMO.
Thanks. You saved me the trouble of ruining a few chants by freezing raw. I noticed that the one I froze and thawed out left golden color in the water that it shed when thawed. Gil
 
That's actually the opposite for chanterelles.

https://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/gtr576.pdf

A study on the Bull Run Watershed by the Oregon Mycological Society, however, determined that harvesting did not reduce mushroom production, although cut patches had a slight reduction compared to patches where the mushrooms were plucked and controlled.

Thirteen years of data provide no evidence that plucking chanterelles has suppressed fruiting; indeed, the data suggest a slight stimulation of fruiting. Until 1999, no statistical correlation was noted between chanterelle productivity and harvest method, but since then a slight depression of chanterelle biomass and abundance has been detected in the “cut” plots relative to the pluck and control plots.

I always pull then cut the dirt off. Keeps mushroom clean and less gritty.
Interesting.
 

Whitefeather

Management Material
Hoss, good photos of the undersides showing a key identifier of chants versus other mushrooms. The false gills show "branching" of the gills which is absent in other mushrooms, but distinctive of chants. Gil
Question: So the branching of the gills is 100% guaranteed to be a Chantrelle?
 

GLS

Classic Southern Gentleman
If the gills run partially down the stem, and the color is golden yellow, and the gills branch, I'd eat it. On smaller, just past the button stage, the gills are in the cap, not developed on the stem, but branch nonetheless. if the gills match what is seen in Hoss's photo, I am comfortable with the identification, but I'm not giving a 100% guarantee what someone else's perception would be.
 

GLS

Classic Southern Gentleman
Stem should be solid, not hollow, and no "sap" should flow when cut. Bugs can hollow out stem, however, on chants that are past prime. Gil
 
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