New fly fisherman here, Rod Question...

Thread starter #1
I’m pretty new at fly fishing but I’d like to get good with an appropriate setup for the area I’ll be fishing, What is the average fly rod setup for fishing in North GA and NC trout streams?
 

Bream Pole

Senior Member
I have a St. Croix Avid 3 wt 7'9" I love that rod. I have a Scientific Anglers Mastery 3 wt line on it and it loads perfectly. Great for bream and I suppose would be for trout as well.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Just remember, tell all of your friends how horrible
fly fishing is!!! Mention, bears, snakes and the
danger of water.:)))))
Lots of panthers and bigfeets up in these hills, too. It's a wonder I ever get out of the woods alive.
 

Tentwing

Senior Member
Redington Classic Trout 8 &1/2 foot 5 weight. That will cover a lot of bases. In North Carolina and Georgia there is everything from large tail water to blue lines, and you can throw larger bass flies with a five weight.
 

TomC

Senior Member
You picked a good setup. If you struggle figuring out which fly's to tie on I'd suggest learning how to tie on a dry dropper rig with a #12 parachute adams floating on top with a #16 or #18 flashback bead head pheasant tail tied about 18"-24" off the parachute adams. Years ago when I started someone gave me this advice and I've yet to find a stream where this combo won't produce. Also, buy a vise and start tying flies. Can be as addictive as actually fishing. Have fun!!
 

Tentwing

Senior Member
Tom is right. At this point in time I actually get more excited about coming up with a new fly that I think will produce than hooking into a good fish.
 

rnfarley

Senior Member
I have to second that fly tying may be more fun that the fishing itself at times because you can do it anytime, give as gifts, etc. and the dry dropper is always a great starting point too. Double good advice there!
 
I bought a 4wt 9’ already so sounds like I should be fine. Thanks guys
Sounds good. I'd like 6' 3wt for some of the places I like to crawl into to fish. For the vast majority of productive places in the areas you're asking about, you aren't going to be doing "A River Runs Through It" kind of casts.

Learn to be proficient with short casts and kinda cane pole drops on the smaller streams. I wouldn't worry about the longer stuff until you're ready unless that's just what you want to do.
 
That 9 footer is going to hamper you in close quarters of many North Georgia's trout streams. I personally use a Wright McGill 7' Sweetheart, and still find myself hemmed in at times. I ran into an old codger in the middle of a small stream. He had a creel full and was using a 5.5 footer fiberglass (can't remember the name). Said that was all he used 90% of the time. But, if you try hard, I think you can make anything work; some rigs just work better than others.
 
That 9 footer is going to hamper you in close quarters of many North Georgia's trout streams. I personally use a Wright McGill 7' Sweetheart, and still find myself hemmed in at times. I ran into an old codger in the middle of a small stream. He had a creel full and was using a 5.5 footer fiberglass (can't remember the name). Said that was all he used 90% of the time. But, if you try hard, I think you can make anything work; some rigs just work better than others.
The tighter, smaller streams are really where I like the extra length. More range roll casting, bow and arrow casting, and dapping your fly back under the limbs and bushes. I fish stuff like this with longer rods:

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