New to the camping game

Thread starter #1
The wife and I have decided we want to get a camper and start using it to go on vacations, deer hunting, lake, mountains, etc. I grew up with an old 67 Nimrod pop up camper, but it was pretty primitive as we never had water or power hooked up to it. We are looking at 25-28ft bumper pull campers with 1-2 slide outs, we have a little one and plan to have another so it will be a family camper, also want to have space if a friend or family member want to come along. I have the truck to pull anything: 97 F350 7.3l powerstroke Crew cab long bed with 162,xxx miles. Any words of wisdom, do’s and don’ts, pro’s and cons, recommendations, etc.... our budget is $6000-$10,000 for now, so we will be looking at used/pre owned.
 

normaldave

Senior Member
This brand was an "oldie but goodie". Top of the line, privately held company, that eventually was bought out by Winnebago in the recession to launch the Winnebago travel trailer business.

Example:
Sunnybrook 29 DBS

All aluminum walls/ceiling frame, heavy duty steel frame, (might have) shock absorbers, wood cabinets, porcelain toilets, hidden hinges on some models, higher quality electrical. Buying used is good if the roof doesn't leak, and you don't mind upgrading interior colors and fabrics to a bit more modern.
Sunnybrook brochure

Also consider hiring a professional RV technician to do a purchase inspection on any trailer you are looking at. Might save lots of heartache down the road.

If I was going to do it over again, well, I'd do some version of what I already did.
7 x 16 Cargo Trailer Conversion
 
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WayneB

Senior Member
You have the capacity to haul anything, so look as big as possible. 5th wheel!
Slideouts leak. This said, some leaks cause damage to framing, some don't. A dead giveaway is distortion of the outside skin. Look at whatever you are considering from 30-50 ft away, and look for any 'blisters' You will be looking for delamination where the outer skin is pulling away from the core. Usually occurs at corners, lower portion of window openings, and beside slide outs. Water damage generally limits to walls and outer perimeter of floor at junction to wall. If you have a moisture meter, probe random spots, deliberately probe anywhere you sense delamination.
Determine your pain threshold against your skill set to perform repairs.
Beyond that, find a floorplan that suits you. Expect to lay out about $1000 on a used camper for sewer hoses, drinking water hoses, Mattress toppers and tires/brakes.
 

transfixer

Senior Member
Above are all good suggestions, one thing to add, if you can , buy from an individual, also try to find one that has been kept under a cover when not used, either a shelter to prevent the elements from always being on the trailer, or at least a cloth cover on it when parked, and plan on doing the same after you buy it, cracks in seams and joints occur from simply pulling the unit down the road, especially when on backroads that aren't paved, as the trailer body will flex and twist no matter what its made of, but water intrusion mainly happens when the trailer sits parked exposed to the elements, keeping those elements off the trailer when parked will greatly extend the life of the trailer .
 
Above are all good suggestions, one thing to add, if you can , buy from an individual, also try to find one that has been kept under a cover when not used, either a shelter to prevent the elements from always being on the trailer, or at least a cloth cover on it when parked, and plan on doing the same after you buy it, cracks in seams and joints occur from simply pulling the unit down the road, especially when on backroads that aren't paved, as the trailer body will flex and twist no matter what its made of, but water intrusion mainly happens when the trailer sits parked exposed to the elements, keeping those elements off the trailer when parked will greatly extend the life of the trailer .
Yep. They are prone to leaks. The new rubber roofs now days.....well...I am on the fence ! The elements will kill em ! The old metal roofs you could work on them !
 

bany

Senior Member
The wife and I have decided we want to get a camper and start using it to go on vacations, deer hunting, lake, mountains, etc. I grew up with an old 67 Nimrod pop up camper, but it was pretty primitive as we never had water or power hooked up to it. We are looking at 25-28ft bumper pull campers with 1-2 slide outs, we have a little one and plan to have another so it will be a family camper, also want to have space if a friend or family member want to come along. I have the truck to pull anything: 97 F350 7.3l powerstroke Crew cab long bed with 162,xxx miles. Any words of wisdom, do’s and don’ts, pro’s and cons, recommendations, etc.... our budget is $6000-$10,000 for now, so we will be looking at used/pre owned.
Don’t buy a Jayco!! Look at the roof and all the seams of trimmed areas. Then inspect the interior for soft spots or rippled walls or black corners. If it leaked,or should I say when it starts leaking it will rot like crazy. If your handy and it’s not terrible rot you can rebuild parts of it it but how much rebuilding do you want to do?
something kept under roof is the best bet.
 

antharper

“Well Rounded Outdoorsman MOD “
I’ve had a couple and wouldn’t trade the time my family has spent camping for anything . I know for sure we’ve saved money on vacations and probably enjoyed it a lot more . With that said do as others have said , by or build u something to put it under out of the weather and you’ll be glad u did !
 
Don’t buy a Jayco!! Look at the roof and all the seams of trimmed areas. Then inspect the interior for soft spots or rippled walls or black corners. If it leaked,or should I say when it starts leaking it will rot like crazy. If your handy and it’s not terrible rot you can rebuild parts of it it but how much rebuilding do you want to do?
something kept under roof is the best bet.

There's nothing wrong with Jayco (or any brand as a whole). Individual units are lemons. I own a 2017 Jayflight and it's been amazing for us. No issues and we use it a lot including 6-8 hour drives and dry camping at our hunting club 8-10 nights a year.

If you're going used, the pre-aquisition Jayco's were some of the best campers on the market.
 
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bany

Senior Member
There's nothing wrong with Jayco (or any brand as a whole). Individual units are lemons. I own a 2017 Jayflight and it's been amazing for us. No issues and we use it a lot including 6-8 hour drives and dry camping at our hunting club 8-10 nights a year.

If you're going used, the pre-aquisition Jayco's were some of the best campers on the market.
I beg to differ! It’s my opinion from first hand experience, on a new unit purchase and dealing with their customer service people. Yours is almost old enough to start showing hidden problems and I truly hope you don’t have any!

My post to the OP predominantly suggested points of interest when looking for a used camper purchase.
I reserve the right to bash a company that did me wrong and cost Me thousands! I merely said don’t buy one.
 
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...and I merely said there's nothing wrong with Jayco or any other brand as a whole. My experience has been that I wouldn't hesitate to look at another Jayco in the future. But I wouldn't say "only buy a Jayco".

Every company that makes campers has had people who have had legit bad experiences. You are towing a "home" that is built with non-residential grade materials down an interstate and exposing it to hurricane force winds and earthquake force shaking at the same time and then some folks leave them exposed to the elements 100% of the time. Stuff is going to happen. Yes, I've had to fix some things here and there. But that's normal in owning a camper.

To the OP, don't buy a camper anticipating that there will be no issues. Doesn't matter what brand or model you buy, there will be repairs. It's the nature of the beast. But it is a TON of fund and absolutely worth it. Buy one that has been taken care of and then you take care of it. It will serve you well.
 
No help but I grew up camping in a Nimrod like this one, lol!
Do you recall about what year model that was, Dodger? The first camper my Dad bought was also a Nimrod, but seems like the slide outs were front to back instead. I'm guessing it was around 67, 68 or so. Then he traded it for a StarCraft pop-up which was used for the next 30 years or more.

BTW, the Nimrod was also pulled with a Falcon wagon, except beige instead of green.
 
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