Pics of backcountry camps

The bear bag limit was increased and you can shoot bears the length of deer season.
I’m so new and know virtually nothing, but that’s not the case on public WMA lands, nor CNF. Only a few weeks on wma’s with a little more time on CNF. Would it be a stupid idea to have limited weeks for deer hunting, but full season for bear? like I said, I’m so new I know nothing so this might be a completely idiotic suggestion. If so, I’m sorry. 😐
 

northgeorgiasportsman

Moderator
Staff member
Never even thought about bringing melatonin camping. Dang. i Dont usually use it but I bet it would be great.
Mtn Ops makes a variety of drink mixes. Among them are some bedtime Slumber mixes like Sleepy Cider, Sleepy Cocoa, Chai etc. I've tried a couple of them, but it makes me sleep hard for a few hours, then wake up way too early.
 
Mtn Ops makes a variety of drink mixes. Among them are some bedtime Slumber mixes like Sleepy Cider, Sleepy Cocoa, Chai etc. I've tried a couple of them, but it makes me sleep hard for a few hours, then wake up way too early.
That's effectively what melatonin does, puts you to sleep - staying asleep is another story. Usually after a long day scouting, hiking, fishing, hunting, I am pretty tired, but often can't just shut my eyes and go to sleep. Maybe I need to try one of those and maybe I need to increase the comfort of my system. Thanks man!
 

devolve

Senior Member
My back wasn't right for a week. Hammocks are for teenagers and 20-year-olds. And, everybody I've camped with who slept in hammocks spent two hours fiddling with them to get them adjusted right.
42 years old with major back issues. I can’t sleep on the ground. My wife always has to wake me up cause I sleep harder camping then I do at home. My hammock takes about 10 minutes to set up start to finish rain fly and all.
I have comfortably slept with temps in the teens with no issues. Using an under quilt or hammock cacoon and you are warm with no issues.
To each his own, but I have only slept in a tent once since owning my hammock.
 

jbogg

Senior Member
Yep. His dad in the tent saved him. :)

Plus, the last time I "slept" in a hammock, it took me two hours to get able to walk when I got up the next morning, and I like to froze to death to boot. My back wasn't right for a week. Hammocks are for teenagers and 20-year-olds. And, everybody I've camped with who slept in hammocks spent two hours fiddling with them to get them adjusted right.
Hillbilly, don’t give up on hammocks just yet. A lot of folks have a bad first experience because they don’t have the proper gear, and as a result never try it again. You have to have some sort of under quilt on the underside of the hammock. Not in between yourself and the hammock. Folks that use a sleeping bag will freeze to death even at temps in the 50s. Once you compress the insulation of a sleeping bag in a hammock you’ve got nothing but cold air beneath you and it can be a miserably cold night even in the summertime.
 

Buckman18

Senior Member
A Bridge Hammock is the ticket. No fiddle factor. It’s like a cot floating on a cloud. A gathered end hammock takes some trial and error for many folks. My War Bonnet Ridge Runner is as simple as it gets. Slept comfortably down into the teens. A proper under quilt and top quilt and you are good to go. Most of my backpack hunts have been solo, but had a non hunting high school buddy tag along a couple of times just to hang out and camp.
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John, How much does this setup weigh? I've never tried the hammock.
 

jbogg

Senior Member
John, How much does this setup weigh?

Buckman, my bridge Hammock weighs more than a traditional gathered end hammock due to the spreader bars. However, the small weight penalty is definitely worth the comfort and reduced fiddle factor. My ridge runner with spreader bars included weighs in at 2 lbs. 12 oz. my cloudburst tarp comes in at 1 lb. 10 oz. so, my entire system comes in at a little under 4 1/2 pounds. Not ultralight, but not bad at all.
 
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jbogg

Senior Member
This was my happy bow season camo in the mountains View attachment 1023979 View attachment 1023978
Looks like you could hunt from your hammock as thick as your campsite is. ;) Seriously, that is one of the nice things about a hammock. All you need is two trees. Rocks and roots don't matter. I have slept on the steep lee side of the mountain to get out of 30 mph gusts. My avatar pic was late February with 10" of snow and night time temps in the teens. It was a little challenging finding firewood under that much snow.
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No pics but I'm still experimenting with the hammock. Had a guy make me one that you sleep sorta sideways in it. It's more flat that way. Fixing to order a fly instead of using a trap to save some weight. I've used a pad but I prefer a sleeping bag. Only bad thing about a hammock is it's little more aggregating to get out of at 3am to take a leak.
 
I’ll try the hammock thing eventually but never have. I use a tent but my two man tent is just so dang small (I use it as a one man tent) and my four man tent which I use truck camping would be a lot of extra weight bushwhacking in somewhere. A hammock is good because it would be so easy to haul.
 

Buckman18

Senior Member
We occasionally are blessed with an old logging road that's still in pretty good shape. When that's the case, an old John Deere lawnmower trailer can make a trip a bit more hospitable and let you enjoy a few more amenities.
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mattuga

Senior Member
Obviously the hammock allows for much better flexibility with choosing a back country camp spot. During the winter you can do a hammock right and stay warm sleeping but there is just no sit up comfort like you get with a tent the next morning waking up. I'll be taking a overnight in July and using my Eno hammock but I am a tent person most of the time if staying more than a night or 2.
 

northgeorgiasportsman

Moderator
Staff member
Me and The Mtn Man were fishing a little blueline a few weeks back and came upon someone's camp. I ain't crazy about all the trash they left, but they definitely spent some time making it feel like home. They made furniture (tables and chairs) out of rocks and sticks. I don't know if they plan to return or not.



 
Me and The Mtn Man were fishing a little blueline a few weeks back and came upon someone's camp. I ain't crazy about all the trash they left, but they definitely spent some time making it feel like home. They made furniture (tables and chairs) out of rocks and sticks. I don't know if they plan to return or not.



Looks like someone prepping for the tv show "Alone"
 

jbogg

Senior Member
Me and The Mtn Man were fishing a little blueline a few weeks back and came upon someone's camp. I ain't crazy about all the trash they left, but they definitely spent some time making it feel like home. They made furniture (tables and chairs) out of rocks and sticks. I don't know if they plan to return or not.



The last time I found a homemade table in a back country camp it turned out to be the remains of an old grow operation. 1eyefishing and I both stumbled onto this remote camp several years apart and he was able to give me the background on it which he had heard from law-enforcement.
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