Quail Density question

Thread starter #1
I purchased 155 acres of land in the lower end of Bulloch County just recently. While walking this land during the spring, I was amazed at the number of Bobwhite quail roosters I heard just on the front half of the property. Hearing those guys brought back some amazing memories from my boyhood of hunting quail with my little liver pointer. Every morning and evening is filled with whistles from roosters.

So, my question is this. I have heard at least 6 roosters in different locations during the same time of day. There may actually be up to 9 different roosters in different locations during the same time of day. What would this 6-9 roosters transfer to actual coveys of quail? I'm anxious for the fall so that I can actually get a covey count!

Thanks for any input.
 
Thread starter #4
@spring Excellent podcast...thank you for sharing.

I realize this was for Texas, so I'm not sure how the numbers would translate to Ga. However, the 6-9 cocks (I learned they are not roosters) I heard would translate to great numbers in Texas. I must say though, hearing that many quail was much greater, by far, than what I have heard anywhere in Ga in many, many years.

As I was walking the property in April and May before I bought it, I did see multiple pairs (hens and cocks) together in several locations.

This makes me even more anxious for fall to get here as I will certainly be "tuning in" to the covey call and preforming covey call surveys.
 

ghadarits

Senior Member
If you have a decent population with decent habitat you're lucky. You might be able to improve it by doing a few prescribed burns in small areas to help them out in the spring when they're nesting. We have a few coveys on my property in Emmanuel County 1600 acres with 7 hunters and our general rule is we only hunt the wild birds sparingly and after the first rise whatever got away got away. We also have a preserve license so we do a lot of pen raised bird hunting.
 
I purchased 155 acres of land in the lower end of Bulloch County just recently. While walking this land during the spring, I was amazed at the number of Bobwhite quail roosters I heard just on the front half of the property. Hearing those guys brought back some amazing memories from my boyhood of hunting quail with my little liver pointer. Every morning and evening is filled with whistles from roosters.

So, my question is this. I have heard at least 6 roosters in different locations during the same time of day. There may actually be up to 9 different roosters in different locations during the same time of day. What would this 6-9 roosters transfer to actual coveys of quail? I'm anxious for the fall so that I can actually get a covey count!

Thanks for any input.
Zaraspook,
Pm me. I’d love to communicate with you on this matter.
Luke
Covey Rise Wildlife Consulting
 

spring

Senior Member
Managing for quail is actually a lot of fun. It truly takes the enjoyment of hunting season to a year-round process. From enhancing winter survival, which boosts the spring nesting numbers, to improving the health of hens, which increases the chances of multiple summer nestings, you really can have a huge impact on the hunting results you'll see. Of course habitat management is a heavy focus, but doing so actually helps so many other aspects of game and wildlife. December disking, feeding, spring burning, the beauty of whistling bobs all summer, young birds coming along, and always, the hope for that thrilling covey rise in late fall, make it a process that is really rewarding. Good luck!
 
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