Something different....... Suggestions?

Thread starter #1
Recently I asked folks on here about dying a wood stock. Hillbilly suggested leather dye which turned out to be a really nice product. However in my test pieces I didn't get the results I was hoping for but will use the heck out of the product for other projects. I also tried various colors of rit dye and wasn't happy with those. Over the years I have finished a good twenty is so stocks with boiled linseed oil, danish oil, tung oil, minwax etc....many of them turned out great no regrets. With this particular stock I want to try something different. The stock I am working on is apparently birch. It is very light in both color and weight has subtle grain and a couple small knots. I have put a lot of work into this rifle (Mauser 98) she has nice lines great balance and has come together nicely. Have any of you folks had any success that you would like to share? I would be most grateful.
 

Darkhorse

Senior Member
The LMF (Laurel Mountain Forge) https://www.laurelmountainforge.com/products.htm line of wood stains are formulated for wood gun stocks. Mostly for maple with a couple for walnut. You would need to pick one you liked and test it. I have used these stains a few times on flintlocks I've built with maple stocks and I'm happy with them.
Years ago I did some modern rifle stocks that were birch and I just got my stains from the hardware store.
I used to use Tru-oil to finish my stocks and I still like it. But now I only use Chambers original oil finish. It's easier to use and to get good results. Plus it seals the wood. https://www.flintlocks.com/parts.htm and https://www.flintlocks.com/pdf/pricesheet.pdf
The secret to a finely finished firearm is the quality prep work that should be done prior to staining, and followed up during the finishing process.





 

Darkhorse

Senior Member
I have used Lancaster Maple but not Honey Maple. If I build another rifle I plan on using Honey Maple on that one.
 

Mauser

Senior Member
Ive used the laurel mountain forge ebony toner then nut brown stain over it then permalyn finish on a original 93 Mauser stock that had 0 figure to it. The ebony toner brought out lines that you couldn't see other wise, but it might take away from a decent piece of wood. The old Mauser is my never take out of the truck gun
 

weagle

Senior Member
I did a birch savage 99E stock one time with tea stain and rust and it turned out beautiful. It's a technique furniture makers use to stain Hickory rockers.

Take some 0000 steel wool and degrease it with acetone. Then dip it in vinegar and lay it out on news paper. In a few days it will turn to powdery rust. Mix this with a little vinegar for your stain.

Pretreat the wood by wiping it down a few times with strong tea. This will cause it to react with the rust stain, giving a nice dark color. Finish with truoil or similar.
 

Stroker

Senior Member
Bone black mixed in with one of the oil finishes will help bring out the grain. You will get your best results when used with the first couple of coats.
 
Have used Minwax stain, whatever shade you prefer, then Minwax satin poly. I prefer a satin finish over shiny or gloss. Have had a number of H&R/NEF rifles with used stocks that needed help, wanted a darker finish than the blonde color of wood.
 
If you like the "tiger maple" look then try wrapping a test piece with a small hemp rope and lightly using a propane torch on it. With a little practice it leaves an awesome looking "tiger stripe" effect. Several how to videos on youtube
 
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Darkhorse

Senior Member
I've seen ramrods done that way that looked pretty good but for a maple stock with figure I want the real thing. The burned rope can't give you the visual depth of the curl like the real thing.
Of course wood with a lot of curl costs some bucks.
 
Thread starter #12
I am thankful to you folks for your tips and suggestions. Although I purchased some of these products and am glad I have them the type of wood in this stock is not responding in the manner I wish. I am thrilled with the Laurel mountain stuff and can't wait to use it on something else. Whatever funky wood this is I am going to use linseed oil..... Again... So much for something different. Thanks for introducing me to these other products
 
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