Starlink Beta in Georgia

Sorry. Satcom guy who worked in spacecraft control here just to settle one thing. If it's in the 12GHz band, like the tom's article up above says it is, that is most definitely impacted by weather. It's called rain fade and there's usually a link budget drawn up where the provider, through remote control of your node, can increase power to and from you, if needed. That's traditional satcom, though, I have no insight into how their network is spec'd but I'd imagine it's much the same.

Other bands have different degradation sensitivities, such as Ka being susceptible to high winds. That's because the beam width, think like a flashlight, gets narrower as you go up in frequency or antenna size. Large antennas, like those at teleports, using Ka frequencies have been known to have degradation due to winds being able to push "sloppy" drives around.
 
Not sure what your beef with Windstream is, but if it's fiber they offer up to 1gig same as most providers. If you're on copper DSL, then that might explain your dilemma since it's a distance based technology so obviously if you're at the end of their line, it's going to be very slow depending on if their DSLAM is also copper fed or fiber fed but either way copper to the house has it's limitations.

Starlink will eat the lunch of most all providers in rural areas using copper DSL but there's no way Starlink can compete with fiber, at least not any time soon.
Who uses windstream and doesn't have a beef with them:ROFLMAO:, if somebody has 1gig service with them and it gets half of that I'd be surprised. My beef with them is all the money they've took and wasted, they haven't even got their rural broadband goal from the Obama years. Starlink is the only way south ga is getting decent internet.

Sorry. Satcom guy who worked in spacecraft control here just to settle one thing. If it's in the 12GHz band, like the tom's article up above says it is, that is most definitely impacted by weather. It's called rain fade and there's usually a link budget drawn up where the provider, through remote control of your node, can increase power to and from you, if needed. That's traditional satcom, though, I have no insight into how their network is spec'd but I'd imagine it's much the same.

Other bands have different degradation sensitivities, such as Ka being susceptible to high winds. That's because the beam width, think like a flashlight, gets narrower as you go up in frequency or antenna size. Large antennas, like those at teleports, using Ka frequencies have been known to have degradation due to winds being able to push "sloppy" drives around.
It gets rain fade which is why it slows down but it also is operating on ku, ka, and v bands and multiple satellites, theres a pretty impressive video on youtube of it maintaining a connection with a pretty thick layer of snow covering the home base antenna.
 
Top