Starter package

bckwzlineman

Senior Member
What kind of setup would you guys recommend for someone who wants to try traditional archery for the first time, My drawlength is 29.25 and would like to stay under a 40 lb draw weight? I need an idea on a decent bow that won't break the bank in case I stink at it, also arrow weights and broadhead suggestions, thanks in advance!
 

Hillbilly stalker

Senior Member
This is the bow that you should probably start with. I have had several brand name production bows, Pearson, Bear, Damon Hyatt, Martin, this bow shoots as well if not better than some of those. You can buy different weight limbs and can also shoot longbow or recurve limbs on it. You will want to upgrade the string. I’ve shot mine for 4-5 years and really like it. You can buy some cheap carbon arrows off Amazon also. That will give you a chance to see if you like it. A traditional bow actually puts the fun back into archery. The simplicity of it is very addictive. You can spend a wad of money on a custom bow and good arrows are pricey. Read the reviews on the bow, you can buy them several places but Amazon return policy makes it worthwhile to buy there. They are all most likely produced in the same factory anyway. IMG_3204.jpeg
 

splatek

UAEC
This is the bow that you should probably start with. I have had several brand name production bows, Pearson, Bear, Damon Hyatt, Martin, this bow shoots as well if not better than some of those. You can buy different weight limbs and can also shoot longbow or recurve limbs on it. You will want to upgrade the string. I’ve shot mine for 4-5 years and really like it. You can buy some cheap carbon arrows off Amazon also. That will give you a chance to see if you like it. A traditional bow actually puts the fun back into archery. The simplicity of it is very addictive. You can spend a wad of money on a custom bow and good arrows are pricey. Read the reviews on the bow, you can buy them several places but Amazon return policy makes it worthwhile to buy there. They are all most likely produced in the same factory anyway. View attachment 1316377

The black hunter is a great bow - you will never have to upgrade unless you care about things like the appearance of the bow. You can get some really really pretty bows, but I don't think they will shoot any better than the Black Hunter. And you can spend a lot, I mean a lot more money for the price you could get about 5 of these bows. That way you would have a hunting bow, a practice bow, a back up bow, a low poundage 3d bow, etc. Just me.
I hunted with mine for several seasons and killed deer and a few bears and even a squirrel (or two).

If you want to upgrade, I, personally, would not go custom (I don't have that kind of money). I picked up a pair of used bear archery bows (kodiak mag and grizzly) and they are ridiculously accurate and fun to shoot. So they might make it into the rotation this season.
 

earlthegoat2

Senior Member
Did you measure your draw length with a compound bow?

You will often go down 3/4-1” in draw length with a trad bow.

I’m a 29 1/2” with a compound but a 28 1/2” with a trad.

Wont really matter as long as you aware of about how much weight goes up or down depending on how much higher or lower you are on the draw length that the bows poundage is based off of. (Usually 28”)

And yes, the black hunter is the way to go. It used to be the Samick Sage was the best trad beginner bow but when the Black Hunter became available it shook up the industry a bit.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
Did you measure your draw length with a compound bow?

You will often go down 3/4-1” in draw length with a trad bow.

I’m a 29 1/2” with a compound but a 28 1/2” with a trad.

Wont really matter as long as you aware of about how much weight goes up or down depending on how much higher or lower you are on the draw length that the bows poundage is based off of. (Usually 28”)

And yes, the black hunter is the way to go. It used to be the Samick Sage was the best trad beginner bow but when the Black Hunter became available it shook up the industry a bit.
This. Mine is 29" with a compound, 26" with a trad bow.
 

dwhee87

GON Political Forum Scientific Studies Poster
Curious... any reason you can't use a mechanical release with a traditional bow? I have a long (31-in) draw...a release buys me an inch or so. Thinking about getting back into archery with one of these bows.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
Curious... any reason you can't use a mechanical release with a traditional bow? I have a long (31-in) draw...a release buys me an inch or so. Thinking about getting back into archery with one of these bows.
I guess you could, but the whole point of going traditional is shooting a bow that is an extension of your own body, not a machine. A 26" draw will put an arrow from a wooden selfbow slap through a deer. Most American Indians probably used more of a 22"-24" draw with a pinch grip.
 

splatek

UAEC
No reason whatsoever you can’t use a d loop and a release. The trad, trad guys will poke fun at you but who cares about that.
I know a few folks do this and use a pin sight. Doesn’t make sense to me, but whatever knocks em down.

I will say that the challenge and intimacy (for lack of better word) of harvesting an animal(s) with fingers on the string is special.
 

Hillbilly stalker

Senior Member
Using a mechanical release on a traditional bow increases the string noise about 3 times past normal.
 

Dennis

Senior Member
I would guess that a mechanical release would improve my accuracy especially at longer ranges because of the consistency of it. I still use a tab but may have to use one in the future.
 
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