Super Blackhawk

Big7

Senior Member

Big7

Senior Member
And... Not a fan of using tiny brass screws with magnum handguns. Good luck.

Hard pass for me. 😁
 

Darkhorse

Senior Member
Me too. Old school toolmaker and morphed into 3D Engineering.

Best of both worlds.

I didn't know you were a toolmaker or I would have never posted that. 😁
No problem. There's a lot that many don't know about me. My career spans lathes and planers ran by leather belts to 5 axis machining centers. From programming NC machines through MDI, to fixture design and manufacture. From the real old time toolmaker to the modern though unelightened methods, to years behind a desk in Engineering data management to software tool design.
I'm not a fan of using brass screws anywhere on a gun. Except maybe to attach a triggerguard on a longrifle.
 

Darkhorse

Senior Member
I've been running a jackweigand single screw mount on my Taurus 357mag. No problems at all with 200+ rounds. Has a vortex venom on top. View attachment 1145865
That's what I've got in mind right there. My aimpoint is mounted on a Ruger 44 auto carbine. I had it out today and decided not to remove it as I sometimes like a light rifle.
 

Big7

Senior Member
No problem. There's a lot that many don't know about me. My career spans lathes and planers ran by leather belts to 5 axis machining centers. From programming NC machines through MDI, to fixture design and manufacture. From the real old time toolmaker to the modern though unelightened methods, to years behind a desk in Engineering data management to software tool design.
I'm not a fan of using brass screws anywhere on a gun. Except maybe to attach a triggerguard on a longrifle.
Same here.
Started out Model Shop Technician later moving to the Tool & Die Department as Sr. Jig builder at Warren/Sherer Division of Kysor Industrial Corporation later, Kysor Warren and still in business as Kysor Warren Epta USA and served as a Vendor when I retired, almost 40 years later, with a business owner that started there as a Machinist 1 where we met. Small wheel in the sky huh?

Union rules but you didn't have to be in the union in Ga. So.. I "bid" on a posted job in Tool & Die. The Chief Engineer over that department literally gave me the answers to all written tests and told me what to expect on the lab tests. He "helped" me get a job that I didn't qualify for and didn't have the seniority the guy that bid against me had. The Engineer simply didn't want the other guy because he was a you- know- what. 😁

Went from there to Evans Tool & Die, now called Evans Metal Stamping and some folks call them Evans Companies. Here, I completed part of my Apprenticeship and met the guy that I later got on with the company I retired from a high paying job as General Manager. The owner still owns the shop and my buddy is still GM and he got on his brother on as VP Engineering there. I also worked at Evans the brother in the early 80's. In between all that, I did the second part of my Apprenticeship with Carson Mold Company in Marietta, building, then designing injection molds on paper and pencil with a drafting machine.They are still in business but have moved a few counties north.

Fast forward a bunch of years, I got my X's son a job with all those guys about 2 months ago as an Apprentice. Talk about a small world.

I moved around for money and I was/am good. I have worked at reputable companies known for high quality and precision in Georgia and 2 controlled atmosphere plastic mold shops in Clearwater, Florida.

I managed several shops. One was a captive, in- house Engineering, R&D Lab and Tool Room. That is Tiedown Engineering in Atlanta. That was probably my favorite and rewarding job. πŸ’™

Started at 17 years old and had to tell a small fib to get on at Warren/Sherer. Supposed to be 18 to work there. Future First Wife's Stepfather worked on a production line there and helped me apply.
I changed my birthday by a year on my application and after a while, they found out but kept me on. 😁


From there, I practically did it all, up to and including Directorships and other high level management positions, and 3D CAD/CAM/CAE.

Many folks don't hardly believe me when I tell them toolmakers live in a VERY small world and everybody knows somebody. As you and I have demonstrated on this board.

PS... I recon I don't have to worry about you messing up a scope mount. :rofl::rofl:

:yeah:
 
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Darkhorse

Senior Member
Same here.
Started out Model Shop Technician later moving to the Tool & Die Department as Sr. Jig builder at Warren/Sherer Division of Kysor Industrial Corporation later, Kysor Warren and still in business as Kysor Warren Epta USA and served as a Vendor when I retired, almost 40 years later, with a business owner that started there as a Machinist 1 where we met. Small wheel in the sky huh?

Union rules but you didn't have to be in the union in Ga. So.. I "bid" on a posted job in Tool & Die. The Chief Engineer over that department literally gave me the answers to all written tests and told me what to expect on the lab tests. He "helped" me get a job that I didn't qualify for and didn't have the seniority the guy that bid against me had. The Engineer simply didn't want the other guy because he was a you- know- what. 😁

Went from there to Evans Tool & Die, now called Evans Metal Stamping and some folks call them Evans Companies. Here, I completed part of my Apprenticeship and met the guy that I later got on with the company I retired from a high paying job as General Manager. The owner still owns the shop and my buddy is still GM and he got on his brother on as VP Engineering there. I also worked at Evans the brother in the early 80's. In between all that, I did the second part of my Apprenticeship with Carson Mold Company in Marietta, building, then designing injection molds on paper and pencil with a drafting machine.They are still in business but have moved a few counties north.

Fast forward a bunch of years, I got my X's son a job with all those guys about 2 months ago as an Apprentice. Talk about a small world.

I moved around for money and I was/am good. I have worked at reputable companies known for high quality and precision in Georgia and 2 controlled atmosphere plastic mold shops in Clearwater, Florida.

I managed several shops. One was a captive, in- house Engineering, R&D Lab and Tool Room. That is Tiedown Engineering in Atlanta. That was probably my favorite and rewarding job. πŸ’™

Started at 17 years old and had to tell a small fib to get on at Warren/Sherer. Supposed to be 18 to work there. Future First Wife's Stepfather worked on a production line there and helped me apply.
I changed my birthday by a year on my application and after a while, they found out but kept me on. 😁


From there, I practically did it all, up to and including Directorships and other high level management positions, and 3D CAD/CAM/CAE.

Many folks don't hardly believe me when I tell them toolmakers live in a VERY small world and everybody knows somebody. As you and I have demonstrated on this board.

PS... I recon I don't have to worry about you messing up a scope mount. :rofl::rofl:

:yeah:
Measure twice and cut once. I haven't messed one up yet.
I also have/had a certificate in Metrology, the science of measurement. Though in our case it was alignment of fixtures and other items through both transits and levels to optical alignment with theodolites and a computer.
But all that's in the past now. The most technical things I've done is building a couple of longrifles. And making a few alterations of the flintlock mechanisms.
 
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fishfryer

🚜frying fish driveler
When it comes to a Single Action handgun, Ruger is hard to beat. I have 3 and plan on one more as soon as I can get my hands on it. I have the Super Single Six, the Blackhawk in 41 Mag and another Blackhawk in 45 Colt. Love em
Ruger single actions are nice
 
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