Tomato question?

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
Arkansas traveler is a good tomato,they make a good crop but are smallish in size.
They're not bad to split like those big beefsteak types, though. Just a good all-around, flavorful medium-sized red mater.
 

NE GA Pappy

Mr. Pappy
I tried the Hossinator last year, but wasn't impressed with it. Might have been just a bad growing season, but they just didn't produce for me
 

fishfryer

frying fish driveler
My tomato variety progression from childhood to today has been 1) Rutgers- Dad and Mom's favorite 2) Big Boy 3) Better Boy 4) Parks Whopper. Any variety that you grow at home is going to be much, much better than what you buy in the store.
We used to get Rutgers by the bundle years ago and Better Boys are very hard to beat. Better Boys are my main mater this year along with some Cherokee Purples.
 

Whitefeather

Management Material
Anyone plant Parker’s Whoppers. They usually do good for me. Haven’t planted any this year though.
Ive grown them for the last couple years. Very durable plant but not a whole lot of production out of them. The maters get bigger than a baseball and my wife loves them. I don’t like tomatoes personally so I take her word for it. I also have a couple Cherokee Purples just for a change. I can bring myself to eat them from time to time.
 

Baroque Brass

Senior Member
Cherokee purple is the best tasting I have had. Its not real prolific and but well worth it.
Rutgers are good and celebrity.
Sweet 100 Cherry, really good.

Cages, find a place building houses and get the left over concrete wire, use 10 squares and fold the end on itself to close it up, will last a LONG time. And you can reach your hand in easily.

I have never pinched the suckers. If you do stick them in water or dirt and root them for more plants. Tomatoes root easily.

I have read somewhere the static electricity through the metal the tomatoes like.

I have heard the really humid times sometimes prevent the pollen form transferring, especially if there is no wind.
Maybe try a blower or tap the cages a few times if you have lots of blooms but no fruits.

Blossom end rot, lack of calcium, but caused by inconsistent water uptake, so Walter says.

I have never grown determinate.
The local fertilizer place sells bags of gypsum, I put it around my plants as the fruit starts to mature to prevent blossom end rot. I’m already seeing aphids and worms on my plants so spraying is essential. Aphids can introduce virus into plants.
 

livinoutdoors

Goatherding non socialist bohemian luddite
Fyi if you dont like the idea of spraying chemical poisons on your maters both Neem oil and Bacillus Thuringeinsis are good options. Neem oil comes from a tree and is certified for organic farming . Spray this in the evening as it can affect pollinators. BT is a bacteria that targets most types of worms. It is also organic certified.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
The only bug problems I've ever had with mater plants outside of a greenhouse are those big evil mater hornworms. You can leave for work in the morning and have big, luxurious, bushy, head-high mater plants; and come home that afternoon to some sad, barren little stubs that would make Charlie Brown's Christmas tree look lush and tropical. They'll even eat the green maters.
 

Redbow

Senior Member
I only plant better boys now other varieties we have tried here on the NC coast but they didn't do well. When we lived in SC I could plant any type tomato and get a big crop but not here. I love the Marion tomatoes but they sure will not grow well in this area of the coast.

Over fertilizing tomatoes isn't good for them either.
 

B. White

Senior Member
The only bug problems I've ever had with mater plants outside of a greenhouse are those big evil mater hornworms. You can leave for work in the morning and have big, luxurious, bushy, head-high mater plants; and come home that afternoon to some sad, barren little stubs that would make Charlie Brown's Christmas tree look lush and tropical. They'll even eat the green maters.

That is all I've ever had bother tomatoes in the spring/early summer. They can eat and crap faster than anything. I've been keeping some tobacco growing to build up my seed stock and plant near the maters. I still get some on both initially, but got my wife a black light and she goes out and night and the tobacco has a lot more that are easier to find. Makes good chicken treats.
 

fishfryer

frying fish driveler
That is all I've ever had bother tomatoes in the spring/early summer. They can eat and crap faster than anything. I've been keeping some tobacco growing to build up my seed stock and plant near the maters. I still get some on both initially, but got my wife a black light and she goes out and night and the tobacco has a lot more that are easier to find. Makes good chicken treats.
Cut worms will eat your tomatoes too
 

fireman32

"Useless Billy" Fire Chief.
The only bug problems I've ever had with mater plants outside of a greenhouse are those big evil mater hornworms. You can leave for work in the morning and have big, luxurious, bushy, head-high mater plants; and come home that afternoon to some sad, barren little stubs that would make Charlie Brown's Christmas tree look lush and tropical. They'll even eat the green maters.
Only thing worse than a hornworm is a dang chicken. My chickens snuck in my garden last year and pecked every mater they could reach.
 

B. White

Senior Member
Cut worms will eat your tomatoes too
I've been lucky everywhere I've lived, but that is been Macon or north. I have had what I guess were aphids in Sept/Oct on some I've planted late, but couple of sprayings with bug buster 0 took care of them. Tiny little things.
 

fireman32

"Useless Billy" Fire Chief.
Epsom salt around the roots or used as a foliar spray. I trim every limb that touches the ground to keep mildew and fungus down. You need good air circulation around the base of the plant. I use cages, I’ve got some older ones that are reasonably stable, the concrete wire is good advice. I also cut the suckers, and pull the first blooms off until the plant is about 2-2.5 feet tall. Keep a daily watch for cutworms and hope the wilt virus doesn’t find your plants.
 

livinoutdoors

Goatherding non socialist bohemian luddite
I go back n forth on trimming mater plants. On the one hand you get better air flow etc. But on the other you now have open cuts on the plant for disease to enter. This year imma let em alone. No pruning. No pullin suckers.
 

B. White

Senior Member
I go back n forth on trimming mater plants. On the one hand you get better air flow etc. But on the other you now have open cuts on the plant for disease to enter. This year imma let em alone. No pruning. No pullin suckers.

It is really hard to compare year over year, since weather conditions vary and may have more of an impact than any action we take and perceived success may be coincidental, and about all that is really proven is the plants survived whatever we tried on em.

I worked in a feed/seed/hardware store in the 80s and wish I had a dollar for every mater growing secret I heard from old folks back then. It was lots of fun during the spring when they would all come in and buy seeds and plants and want to talk, kind of like reading these threads.

I have done it both ways too and couldn't really tell any difference in health or production. Now I just hit the bottom leaves laying on the ground. Makes getting weeds out easier.
 

livinoutdoors

Goatherding non socialist bohemian luddite
It is really hard to compare year over year, since weather conditions vary and may have more of an impact than any action we take and perceived success may be coincidental, and about all that is really proven is the plants survived whatever we tried on em.

I worked in a feed/seed/hardware store in the 80s and wish I had a dollar for every mater growing secret I heard from old folks back then. It was lots of fun during the spring when they would all come in and buy seeds and plants and want to talk, kind of like reading these threads.

I have done it both ways to and couldn't really tell any difference in health or production. Now I just hit the bottom leaves laying on the ground. Makes getting weeds out easier.
Yeah good point. Its really hard to get a controlled experiment going. I've got several types growing this year in the hopes of finding a clear winner. We'll see!
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
Only thing worse than a hornworm is a dang chicken. My chickens snuck in my garden last year and pecked every mater they could reach.
Turkeys got mine a few years ago while I was at work. I would never have thought about that.
 
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