Trapping question

Thread starter #1

antharper

“Well Rounded Outdoorsman MOD “
Back when I was first learning to trap I seen a video about how sweat dripping around your set was awful . The reason I ask was today I was setting my traps and it was sure hot and humid and I was dripping . I tried to keep it wiped off but it wasn’t working to good . Do any of u worry about it ?
 

Doug B.

Senior Member
If I have an animal in my trap I usually take it out without gloves. When I make a set or do a remake I wear gloves, not to keep scent off the trap, but to keep dirt and mud off my hands. When I put bait and lure down I wear gloves. Not to keep my scent out, but to keep bait and especially lure off my hands. Some of that stuff is like hog manure. You can't wash it off, it has to wear off. I also use a pad to kneel on when I'm making a set. Not to keep my scent off the ground, but cause I'm getting old and sometimes the hard ground don't feel good on my knees.

Like furtaker said, you can't hide the fact that you have been there from a coyote. A lot of people go to far with scent control and the coyotes still know they have been there. They also know that you are not there now.
 

280 Man

Senior Member
If I have an animal in my trap I usually take it out without gloves. When I make a set or do a remake I wear gloves, not to keep scent off the trap, but to keep dirt and mud off my hands. When I put bait and lure down I wear gloves. Not to keep my scent out, but to keep bait and especially lure off my hands. Some of that stuff is like hog manure. You can't wash it off, it has to wear off. I also use a pad to kneel on when I'm making a set. Not to keep my scent off the ground, but cause I'm getting old and sometimes the hard ground don't feel good on my knees.

Like furtaker said, you can't hide the fact that you have been there from a coyote. A lot of people go to far with scent control and the coyotes still know they have been there. They also know that you are not there now.
This^^^^^^^^^ Could not have said it any better! Especially the part about getting old!! LOL
 
I don't worry about things like that anymore. They know you've been there, especially right after you make a set. Coyote sets only get better after they age a few days, in my experience anyway.

I used to think it was a big no-no to touch traps with bare hands, but I gave up on that a long time ago as well.
Years ago when you read a coyote or fox trapping article or book you would be led to believe they “knew” what a trap was and if they smelled steel they wouldn’t approach because they knew it was a trap set
 

280 Man

Senior Member
Years ago when you read a coyote or fox trapping article or book you would be led to believe they “knew” what a trap was and if they smelled steel they wouldn’t approach because they knew it was a trap set
There's still a lot of that thought process now! When I first started you woulda thought you were trapping coyotes that would qualify for Mensa membership!

With that said, you bed one improperly to where it gives a little the yote will laugh at you by digging it up. But they are not digging because it's a trap they are digging in that soft ground because it's not natural!

Imo, outside of location bedding a trap is the MOST important thing if trapping a coyote!
 
Last edited:
Thread starter #8

antharper

“Well Rounded Outdoorsman MOD “
I don't worry about things like that anymore. They know you've been there, especially right after you make a set. Coyote sets only get better after they age a few days, in my experience anyway.

I used to think it was a big no-no to touch traps with bare hands, but I gave up on that a long time ago as well.
I know I’m about ready to give up after 4 or 5 days and then bam . Catch one then next no another or 2 , set 8 sets yesterday and had a Coon , possum , grey fox and a armadillo , my first armadillo
 

Doug B.

Senior Member
I know I’m about ready to give up after 4 or 5 days and then bam . Catch one then next no another or 2 , set 8 sets yesterday and had a Coon , possum , grey fox and a armadillo , my first armadillo
Wow! I need to take armadillo trapping lessons! What did you use for bait?😂
 

buckpasser

Senior Member
I was wondering if I was just waisting my time a few weeks ago. I sweat bad and it was rolling off my head all into the set. I tried to control it, but it was just too hot. That turned out to be a very successful run, so I’m convinced it’s not the end of the world.

I pulled all my traps today and they sure were a sad sight slowly snapping out of that mud!
 
Thread starter #11

antharper

“Well Rounded Outdoorsman MOD “
Wow! I need to take armadillo trapping lessons! What did you use for bait?😂
I forget the name of it , but I’m sure he was after those little black ants , it was a set where I caught a coyote a couple weeks ago . I noticed a lot of them in the pile of pine straw from the old catch circle after I had staked my trap down and didn’t have my hole diggers to move it !
 
Thread starter #13

antharper

“Well Rounded Outdoorsman MOD “
Nothing but another Coon this morning , made a couple more sets today and used bacon grease for bait , someone on here mentioned it !
 
There's still a lot of that thought process now! When I first started you woulda thought you were trapping coyotes that would qualify for Mensa membership!

With that said, you bed one improperly to where it gives a little the yote will laugh at you by digging it up. But they are not digging because it's a trap they are digging in that soft ground because it's not natural!

Imo, outside of location bedding a trap is the MOST important thing if trapping a coyote!
Location and bedding is the key IMO also. But I have also found that you need to change baits at times. I have a few trail cams out overlooking traps and saw that coyotes were shying away from my sets. So a few days later I took out a small hog ham from the freezer (it was bad and I saved it) and used it to bait my sets. First night one coyote one racoon one opossum. Two nights later two opossum and one coyote. This week two coons three opossum and one more coyote. The racoons and opossums are always going to get into our traps but the coyotes were shying off.
Let me know if Y'all have had the same experience.
 

280 Man

Senior Member
Location and bedding is the key IMO also. But I have also found that you need to change baits at times. I have a few trail cams out overlooking traps and saw that coyotes were shying away from my sets. So a few days later I took out a small hog ham from the freezer (it was bad and I saved it) and used it to bait my sets. First night one coyote one racoon one opossum. Two nights later two opossum and one coyote. This week two coons three opossum and one more coyote. The racoons and opossums are always going to get into our traps but the coyotes were shying off.
Let me know if Y'all have had the same experience.
I used Alpo canned dog food to catch this one a few weeks back but when it gets hot I use very little to no bait! Only urine and scents. Sometimes beaver castor, mouse based lure etc.. Ive also used the Gains burger type dog food as bait! 20200507_112539.jpg
 

Doug B.

Senior Member
I would recommend a liquid type bait like Reuwsaat's Liquid Frenzy Predator Bait or something similar. I've never trapped in the summer, but in my opinion a liquid type bait would soak in the ground so the ants couldn't get it and neither could the coyotes.
 
Top