Using Drag Chain in Lower Etowah

Thread starter #1

noch

New Member
Hey, so I just got a Coosa HD that I will mostly be using on the lower Etowah, near Euharlee. I wanted to see if others have used drag chains in that area and their thoughts on it? There are plenty of debates on the risk across the internet but figured I would ask for some local opinions. Seems the main risk is a snag and the current pulling your boat down. I thought about testing by just throwing out a bigger anchor with a buoy on the line and holding it to see what the boat does and I can just toss the line.

Thanks
 
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At least have a carabiner you can unclip in a hurry, and a section of pool noodle knotted on the end for a float, so you can maneuver back, and recover the anchor. I don't like anchors in current in the 'yak, myself. In a lake, I use it all the time. I have a 10 lb section of inner-tube covered heavy log chain, but even that has got snagged to where it took some hard yanking and maneuvering to get it loose.
 

Ruger#3

RAMBLIN MOD
Staff member
I’ve used covered chain quite a bit in rivers without any issue. I suppose high flow rate could cause a problem. I’ve also got a knife within reach at all times.
 
Thread starter #4

noch

New Member
Thanks, yeah I picked up a fixed blade knife to keep handy and may try and rig up a quick release. Any ideas on a good place to pick up heavy chain? I have been to two Ace HWs, Home Depot, Lowes, and Tractor Supply. The largest/heaviest I found was 3/8 but its not really that heavy. My 18in chain is only a little over a lb. I can double up or add a weight but the coosa has a nice area for the chain to sit so hoping to just find some heavier chain.
 

Ruger#3

RAMBLIN MOD
Staff member
Try TSC.....
 

Anvil Head

Senior Member
I have used chain in the past but now use an old shash weight (old school window weight) that is about 10#s works as well for me and rides well in one of the rod holders built into my Coosa.
The quick release with a float is the way to go. learned to do that in salt water flats. More to be able to chase the bigun's than leave hung up, but works just the same.
 
Thread starter #7

noch

New Member
For a quick test I threw out a 10lb mushroom anchor at the Hardin Bridge ramp last week. It dug into the mud and locked me down in current. My yak didn't sink and I was able to pull me and yak back to the anchor and dislodge it. The flow was at 1500 cfs according the recorded line and that is about the most I think I would want to even float it at. I guess they are not generating but just letting that amount of water through the dam. I feel very confident about using a chain when the flow is back down. I think it was more like 300-500 last year. That being said, I went ahead and ordered an NRS co pilot knife to keep on me. I could totally see how things could turn south in the wrong spot.

Thanks for the input!
 

weagle

Senior Member
I use an 18" section of chain that weighs 3 1/4 lbs. It will drag along very slowly in the Chattahoochee and keep the Kayak at the right angel to fish.
 
Thread starter #10
Do you remember where you got it from? My 18in chain only weights a little over one lb and is not very effective. I have looked all over town. TSC, Ace, HD, Lowes, farm supply place. All I can find is what I already have which is 3/8 zinc coated and kinda light.
 
Noch - You ever venture over to Cabella's/BP on Hwy92 & I-75? If so I've got a suitable chunk of heavy chain. Haven't weighed it but it's well over 5# (thinking more like 8#).
I can weigh it if I can remember to. Send me a pm if interested.

Everyone: Be aware! Although some of the types mentioned will work better at slowing drift and slipping through river bottom obstacles - none are completely snag proof! ALWAYS be prepared to untie, slip loose, or cut your line. Only takes once to really mess up your day. Be safe!
 
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