What does a "clear shot" mean to you?

There was an article 20 or so years ago where someone shot everything from a 22 to a 12 ga slug through a match stick that sat about 3ft in front of a target at 100 yards. The 12ga slug was the only thing without much deflection. No such thing as a brush gun in my opinion unless you are referring to a shorter barrel that doesn't get hung on limbs easily.
I'm not doubting you... Okay, maybe I am :huh: Would like to see that article. I'm sure there would be some deflection but I can't imagine it would make much of a difference. Physics are an interesting thing, for sure.
 
I wish I could still find it but there was a fellow on another forum that tested "brush busting" by setting up different size diameter dowels at varying distances from the target. In short, all calibers were affected to some degree after hitting the dowels but lighter bullets were affected more than heavier ones. It's best just to wait for a hole instead of trying to get lucky and push one through that might result in an injured animal.
 
I think a lot depends on how that test was conducted. A match stick or dowel, depending how how it was secured/anchored could be way different than a branch or twig that has essentially unrestricted movement as part of a larger branch or bush.

Look, I'm not advocating to shoot through thick brush, but if it's just a tiny overhanging twig in my way AND the target is immediately behind it, i'm still going to let lead fly. Again, not everyone has the luxury of hunting over a peanut field, some of us are in the thick and it comes with the territory.
 

Rich M

Senior Member
https://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/hunting/2014/05/how-much-does-brush-deflect-rifle-bullet/

I seen a video where the guy put limbs horizontal and made a wall of "brush" to shoot thru. These were thumb sized and thicker limbs. It wasn't as scientific as the more modern day stuff - he shot 1/2 doz diff calibers and wt bullets thru it and showed the results. The faster bullets shot better in that case.

Interesting topic - Chuck Hawks talks about the 12 ga slug in a short writeup where he reiterates someone else's write-up - O Connor I believe.
 
to me a clear shot means just that , I need to be able to see the whole animal at some point, I've seen many deer walking through brush that I probably could have taken, but wouldn't because of not having a clear shot. To me that means NOTHING in the way of my round, I'm more particular than most though, I only aim for a relatively small area high and slightly behind the shoulder on a deer, roughly about 4 sq inches, if I can't put a bullet there with confidence, I don't pull the trigger, for that I have to see at least the front half of the animal free and clear of obstacles
 
https://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/hunting/2014/05/how-much-does-brush-deflect-rifle-bullet/

I seen a video where the guy put limbs horizontal and made a wall of "brush" to shoot thru. These were thumb sized and thicker limbs. It wasn't as scientific as the more modern day stuff - he shot 1/2 doz diff calibers and wt bullets thru it and showed the results. The faster bullets shot better in that case.

Interesting topic - Chuck Hawks talks about the 12 ga slug in a short writeup where he reiterates someone else's write-up - O Connor I believe.
Good study. I think it's important to consider that he is sending his round through 26-yards of brush. I would emphasize that the density of the brush and the distance to the target are key multipliers to altering bullet path.
 

Rich M

Senior Member
Some folks need to get the overall experience of shooting heavier calibers. Someone w sufficient experience doesn't question his equipment cause he already knows what it'll do.

. 22 is great for practice but I think most guys would get more shooting 5 rounds of hunting ammo off a bench or rest every range trip. Say 5 or 6 range trips per year.

Its not enough to hurt, and they'll shoot it better. That'll build confidence and ability.

Seems like a lot of newbies in the sport. These guys didn't grow up w a gun in hand.
 

Spotlite

Senior Member
For me, clear means just that. Nothing between my eyes (scope) and the target area. I don’t mind a limb covering the hind quarters cause I’m not shooting the hind quarters.
 
I wish I could still find it but there was a fellow on another forum that tested "brush busting" by setting up different size diameter dowels at varying distances from the target. In short, all calibers were affected to some degree after hitting the dowels but lighter bullets were affected more than heavier ones. It's best just to wait for a hole instead of trying to get lucky and push one through that might result in an injured animal.
When I read your post I immediately thought, where have I read of this experiment before, and then I remembered, in Craig Boddington's
"American Hunting Rifles," Brush Busters-Fact of Fiction. I pulled the book off the shelf and copied the page regarding the test. See attached:
 

Attachments

When I read your post I immediately thought, where have I read of this experiment before, and then I remembered, in Craig Boddington's
"American Hunting Rifles," Brush Busters-Fact of Fiction. I pulled the book off the shelf and copied the page regarding the test. See attached:
Yep, that was it. A good read for sure. Thanks!
 

huntfish

Senior Member
Some folks need to get the overall experience of shooting heavier calibers. Someone w sufficient experience doesn't question his equipment cause he already knows what it'll do.

. 22 is great for practice but I think most guys would get more shooting 5 rounds of hunting ammo off a bench or rest every range trip. Say 5 or 6 range trips per year.

Its not enough to hurt, and they'll shoot it better. That'll build confidence and ability.

Seems like a lot of newbies in the sport. These guys didn't grow up w a gun in hand.
Very true. I've been shooting almost 50 years now and 40 of them a same rifle. It's all scratched and ugly, but I've taken big game up to 600 yards with it. I have zero doubt where the bullet is going to hit when I squeeze the trigger.
 

biggdogg

Senior Member
It's definitely an interesting question, to which I don't have a clear answer. For me personally, I might take a shot at a hog if there was some light brush in the bullet's path, but I would never do the same with a deer or elk.
If you wouldn't take the shot on a deer or an elk, then why would you take the shot on a hog? You should aim for a clean, quick kill, regardless of the target.
 

JustUs4All

Slow Mod
Staff member
For the same reason that I will poison vermin but not game animals.
 
Thread starter #37
If you wouldn't take the shot on a deer or an elk, then why would you take the shot on a hog? You should aim for a clean, quick kill, regardless of the target.
Two reasons:

1. Most of my shots on an elk will be more than 100 yards
2. I respect elk a lot more than I respect wild hogs

I’m always going to take what I think is a safe and ethical shot, but if there’s light brush between me and a pig in a creek bottom at 20 yards, I’m probably going to take it. If my crosshairs are on the vitals of a pig with a few twigs in the way, I consider that perfectly reasonable for me personally - but I wouldn’t tell you what you “should” do in that scenario.
 
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