What is this ?

GLS

Classic Southern Gentleman
Nice finds. Here's a video of a man in Scandinavia hunting the European version of the Waller knife. Struck from a core, but without the notches. These blades must have been the Stanley disposable box cutters of the Stone Age on both sides of the Atlantic. Gil
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="
" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
Nice finds. Here's a video of a man in Scandinavia hunting the European version of the Waller knife. Struck from a core, but without the notches. These blades must have been the Stanley disposable box cutters of the Stone Age on both sides of the Atlantic. Gil
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="
" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Prismatic blades are the best known method for getting the maximum amount of cutting surface from a chunk of rock. And if it's good rock, those blades are as sharp as or sharper than razor blades.
 

Nicodemus

ADMINISTRATOR
Staff member
I have a friend in Norway who practices European Neolithics. He can take a core and turn out an incredible amount of beautiful blades. His Laurel Leaf points are unbelievable. Ben Kirkland and John Tuttle can make fine core blades too.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
I have a friend in Norway who practices European Neolithics. He can take a core and turn out an incredible amount of beautiful blades. His Laurel Leaf points are unbelievable. Ben Kirkland and John Tuttle can make fine core blades too.
I have a small ancient prismatic blade that a guy sent me from Germany.
 
Thread starter #27

antharper

“Well Rounded Outdoorsman MOD “
Staff member
I’m glad I found that little piece buried in a box of broken points . I’ve learned a lot from this thread
 
Top