Wild pork can be great to eat.

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Son

Senior Member
It's all about how it's killed, butchered and prepared. In my opinion, wild pork is best table fare if killed instantly without it becoming agitated. Dropped instantly with one shot to the head. Then bled out and butchered in short order. Once on the hanging pole, I can skin using a carpet knife, dismember in short order and have in running cool water until the water remains clear. Put on ice and keep in the ice chest with plenty ice for couple days. I like to bone out the hams, using some for sausage, the grill, crock pot or mixed with venison and ground. I hang by the head, works best for me. Back straps are made into small boneless pork chops.
 

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Gator89

Senior Member
We used to cut the ribs off the backbones and when we had enough, boil 'em in a big cast iron kettle and make enough pork & rice to feed half the county.

A butcher once told me he preferred head down for the blood to drain out better, so I have always followed his advice, deer or hog.

Some folks put the right leg in their pants first, some the left, either way gets the job done.
 
I have never had a bad wild hog.

My favorite way to cook it. I cut it in to roast. Cook in the crock pot with a cup of water and some salt and pepper for 6 hours. Take it out and let cool. Mince with a knife and pour the baroque sauce to it.
 
I shot my first hogs this year on Ossabaw, and came home with about 100 Lbs of pork plus one smaller whole pig. The whole pig I did in our outdoor roaster (google "La Caja China" ) which was absolutely delicious. The rest of the pork I have used so far to do crock pot pulled pork, a braised pork butt, and chops from the backstraps. Definitely a lot of low and slow cooking is in order for this meat, but so far everything except one preparation (I tried an online carnitas recipe which came out too salty) was really good.

-E
 

Tugboat1

Senior Member
I add kosher salt to my icing down routine and I think it helps draw out blood better. I also brine with herbs, spices, etc. individual cuts before cooking after I break them down. But since I started making ear shots quality of meat, sow or boar, has been more consistent
 
Is it best to remove ALL fat ? I’ve killed several that didn’t stink in the woods....but stunk up the house while cooking. Rancid tasting. I always quarter them in the woods and gave them on ice in an hour but usually quicker.I ice them for several days.
 

antharper

“Well Rounded Outdoorsman MOD “
Staff member
Is it best to remove ALL fat ? I’ve killed several that didn’t stink in the woods....but stunk up the house while cooking. Rancid tasting. I always quarter them in the woods and gave them on ice in an hour but usually quicker.I ice them for several days.
When I make sausage I use the fat that’s on the hog . So I say no on removing the fat
 
Is it best to remove ALL fat ? I’ve killed several that didn’t stink in the woods....but stunk up the house while cooking. Rancid tasting. I always quarter them in the woods and gave them on ice in an hour but usually quicker.I ice them for several days.
This is a really interesting question I have wondered and researched - but have never arrived at a definitive answer. I guess it just depends, but surely the fat on some of these wild hogs is tasty, but I would guess it's highly dependent upon diet.
 
Depends what theyre eating. Ive had some from the mtns in acorn years that were fantastic. But in a failure year when theyre mostly eating worms and briar stems, they can be rough.
 
All that I’ve killed came from the swamps. I always cut the black gland (?) from inside the rear hams. Some of them seem like they just aint fit to eat. I cook them all, me or the dogs one eat em. Most are between 100-150 pounders.
 

dang

Senior Member
Depends what theyre eating. Ive had some from the mtns in acorn years that were fantastic. But in a failure year when theyre mostly eating worms and briar stems, they can be rough.
100% depends on the animal's diet. I would cut a piece off, throw it in a skillet and try a piece when you are butchering it. Personally, i'd almost rather have the fat than the meat sometimes....i love me some fat. Like mentioned above, a lot of folks cut it in with deer or other ground as well.
 
Our Talbot County pigs must eat good besides our corn as I have never had a bad one and that includes a 300lb sow. We lifted her with a tractor and weighed her on a scale. She ate great.
I have never came up on one I shot that smelled rank, if I did I would probably not butcher it.
ON a side note I made my first wild pork sausage from some 50-70lb pigs. I used the Leggs seasoning. I did not add any fat.
The sausage tasted good. It needed more seasoning and was a little dry. I will add bacon or pork fat to the next batch. I only did a few lbs to test it out.
 

BeerThirty

Senior Member
As someone who has never hunted wild boar, educate me about all the alleged diseases/worms they carry and the necessary extra precautions while dressing and processing the carcass.
 
Brucellosis seems to be the predominate one spoken of. They also carry several different types of bacteria that are very harmful to humans. I always wear latex gloves when quartering them up and skinning them. There are several older posts on here about people who have been infected and they are all bad. I always 1/4 mine up in the woods and pack them out. I clean my knife and anything else used with Clorox wipes. Take care not to get any blood or body fluids on you including eyes and mouth. Brucellosis is commonly found near their reproductive organs from what I've read. You can handle 100 bare handed and not have a problem....or the first one you grab might be the one. I cook pork thoroughly to kill anything unseen inside.
 

antharper

“Well Rounded Outdoorsman MOD “
Staff member
Had some wild hog sausage this morning , that was a pretty good video. I’ve done several similar in the woods when it’s to far to drag . Only thing I do different is skin before I quarter B2A10017-000D-416F-AC44-C1A772FFFE0D.jpeg
 

Okie Hog

Senior Member
Most of my hogs are killed from tree stand and blinds. My pickup has a deer/hog hanger. Immediately after killing a hog it is hung and the throat cut. IMO: Letting an animal bleed out improves meat quality.

 
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