How Jasper County's Murder Creek got it's name....

Jasper

Senior Member
Thread starter #1
I've hunted in Jasper Co. for years and have sometimes wondered where this creek's name came from..........thought some may find this interesting.

Murder Creek History

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J.S. "Chick" Wilson 28.MAY.09

Murder Creek is the name of a large creek in Jasper County. Old plats, maps and deed records dating back into the 1700s show Murder Creek as a main waterway in our county. It seems that every old map you study shows Murder Creek forming in the northeastern part of the county just south of Farrar.

It then grows larger as it meanders southeast through the county crossing Post Road at the old Ludie Kelly store, Hwy. 83 just southwest of Shady Dale and then crosses Hwy. 16 near the Putnam line and then into the Oconee or Lake Sinclair. It forms one of the largest watershed areas of the county and is open for future development.

Many stories have been told as to how the creek got its name and most are different. Here is probably the true history of how it got its name as noted in Indian Affairs, Vol 1, pp 19-20, Ala/Ga Indian History. If you have a better and more accurate story let me know.

In about 1788 a bloody transaction occurred in our area. The Creeks were active upon the Georgia frontier, engaged in the settlement of Oconee lands; they reduced the town of Greensboro to ashes including the Courthouse. They also carried to the Creek Nation white captives as well as much plunder.

A Colonel McGillivry formed an acquaintance with many royalists and among them, Colonel Kirkland of South Carolina. They all later met at a house upon the Coosa River in 1788, with his son, his nephew and several other gentlemen.

They were on their way to Pensacola, where they intended to procure passports, and settle in the Spanish province of Louisiana. When they left, McGillivry sent his servant to guide them to Pensacola. The presence of the servant would assure the Indians that they were friends, for it was dangerous to travel in this area without the Chieftain’s protection.

The Colonel and his party had much silver in their saddlebags. When they arrived within a mile of this large creek that flows into the Conecuh(Oconee?), they met a pack horse party, about sunset, going up to the Indian nation. They had been to Pensacola on a trading expedition.
The party consisted of a Hillabee Indian, who had murdered so many men that he was called the “Man-slayer,” a white man who had fled from the states for the crime of murder, and on account of his ferocity the Indians called him “Cat,” along with Bob a bloodthirsty Negro.

By night the Colonel and his men were settled in and out of sight and the scoundrels camped across the creek near the trading trail. As soon as the Colonel’s party went to sleep with their saddlebags, full of silver, under their heads and their guns against a tree, the wretches from the other side of the creek slipped in and seized all the guns and killed all of them, dividing the booty.

The group then proceeded to the Creek Nation, and when the horrid affair became known, Colonel McGillivray sent persons in pursuit of them and captured Cat but the others escaped. Milford was directed to convey the scoundrel to the spot where he had shed the blood of these men and there to hang him, until he was dead.

Upon the journey Milford secured him in temporary stocks with notched pine logs. Reaching the creek where Kirkland and his party were murdered, Cat was suspended to the limb of a tree of which was still stained with the blood of the unfortunates. While he was hanging, the Frenchman stopped his motions with a pistol ball. Such is the origin of the name “Murder Creek.”

This seems like a logical story so now when we see the signs on the bridges over “Murder Creek” we know where it got its name.
 
#2
Me and my dad hunted a club in Jasper county for 34 years and murder creek run through part of but I never knew where it may have gotten it's name but this sounds as good as anything else I've heard.:huh:
 

LLove

Senior Member
#3
Makes sense.. thanks for the history :cool:
 
#4
I used to think it got it's name because it is murder trying to stay in the narrow creek channel above Little River and not run aground.

Then a couple of years ago I was going up Murder Creek between Little River and the bridge and saw there were a bunch of boats anchored on a little spot next to the channel.

I figured they had found some schooling fish and I didn't want to spook them, so I dropped the trolling motor to ease on by. Plus, I wanted to see what they were catching.:D

When I got closer I noticed that nobody in the 6 or 7 boats had a line in the water or even holding a fishing rod but instead they were all staring intently at the opposite bank.

As I drew up next to them I finally saw what caused the traffic jam.

There was a gorgeous little hottie in a bikini doing yardwork and really looking good.:love:

As I passed by I heard one guy say " Oh Man! She's killing me!"

But I guess it's possible that your story could have some truth on the origin of the name Murder Creek.

And yes, I did fish that area very carefully for while. Just to make sure I didn't miss anything. Of course I mean fishing action.:D
 

LLove

Senior Member
#5
I used to think it got it's name because it is murder trying to stay in the narrow creek channel above Little River and not run aground.

Then a couple of years ago I was going up Murder Creek between Little River and the bridge and saw there were a bunch of boats anchored on a little spot next to the channel.

I figured they had found some schooling fish and I didn't want to spook them, so I dropped the trolling motor to ease on by. Plus, I wanted to see what they were catching.:D

When I got closer I noticed that nobody in the 6 or 7 boats had a line in the water or even holding a fishing rod but instead they were all staring intently at the opposite bank.

As I drew up next to them I finally saw what caused the traffic jam.

There was a gorgeous little hottie in a bikini doing yardwork and really looking good.:love:

As I passed by I heard one guy say " Oh Man! She's killing me!"

But I guess it's possible that your story could have some truth on the origin of the name Murder Creek.

And yes, I did fish that area very carefully for while. Just to make sure I didn't miss anything. Of course I mean fishing action.:D
the original post seems more realistic.. but yours is MUCH more entertaining! :rofl: :banana::banana:
 
#7
Murder Creek

Thanks Jasper,I have hunted on Rock Eagle Rd just a couple miles out side of Monticello sense 1981.I have wondered for years how this creek got its name,Thanks again for the history.
 

sinclair1

Senior Member
#10
I was looking at purchasing some land on burtom road and ask the old guy the same question , He laughed and said people make up all kind of stuff but It simply means (a flock of crows) I went home and googled a flock of crows and it confirmed this. As to if this guy make this up, I dont know :confused:
 
#12
When I was growing up in the late 70's and early 80's we had a cabin on the mouth of Murder creek (on Burton Rd. Sinclair)right before it empties into lake Sinclair. I knew every inch of that creek and have some of my fondest memories growing up there. When my dad bought the property he had asked around as to how the creek had become named Murder Creek. Someone told him it was because there was a lynching on the creek and that was it. Can't wait to show him this story, thanks for sharing!
 

bilgerat

GONetwork Member
#13
I used to think it got it's name because it is murder trying to stay in the narrow creek channel above Little River and not run aground.

Then a couple of years ago I was going up Murder Creek between Little River and the bridge and saw there were a bunch of boats anchored on a little spot next to the channel.

I figured they had found some schooling fish and I didn't want to spook them, so I dropped the trolling motor to ease on by. Plus, I wanted to see what they were catching.:D

When I got closer I noticed that nobody in the 6 or 7 boats had a line in the water or even holding a fishing rod but instead they were all staring intently at the opposite bank.

As I drew up next to them I finally saw what caused the traffic jam.

There was a gorgeous little hottie in a bikini doing yardwork and really looking good.:love:

As I passed by I heard one guy say " Oh Man! She's killing me!"

But I guess it's possible that your story could have some truth on the origin of the name Murder Creek.

And yes, I did fish that area very carefully for while. Just to make sure I didn't miss anything. Of course I mean fishing action.:D
Pictures please.... or it didn't happen...:)
 

sparky

Senior Member
#14
the storey that Jasper related is in alabama,right above Brewton al,the conecuh river flows into fl,where it becomes escambia and into escambia bay,part of pensacola bay
 
#15
I've hunted a lease along Murder creek just outside of Monticello quite a bit. My brother is a member now.

He told me last night it's just about dried up right now. Pockets of water, but not flowing.
 

66 POJ

Senior Member
#16
As youngsters we would camp out at the falls, on the state owned land. We ran limb lines and had a blast catching big cats all along the river. It was also the home to the most cottonmouths I had ever seen, they were all over the trees.
One night the fire was dying down. I got up and fetched a few limbs/logs for the fire. One of them logs was semi-hollowed out. After about 5 minutes of being on the fire a small rattler came crawling out and was making its way towards one of the guys who was asleep. I grabbed a hachet and swung it at the snake. About that time the aforementioned sleeping guy woke up to me swinging a hachet in his direction. Needless to say he began questioning our friendship until he saw ole no legs squirming without a head.
We had some great times on Murder Creek.
 
#17
OMG!!

Yessss!

I know this thread was bumped from 2009 but glory be! I have wondered this exact thing for so many years!

We moved down from VA to GA back in 2010 and one day I decided to go exploring. I found Charlie Elliot preserve one day by accident, late in the afternoon. I wasn't positive if it was public land or not b/c it's a gravel road....so I was already a little wary about where I was.....and then I come across a street sign that says Murder Creek Trail.....


NOPE.

I pulled a u-turn and headed back to the hard pavement lol!!


I did end up fishing there several times but I always wondered "why in the world would someone name a place that!?"
 
#18
OMG!!

Yessss!

I know this thread was bumped from 2009 but glory be! I have wondered this exact thing for so many years!

We moved down from VA to GA back in 2010 and one day I decided to go exploring. I found Charlie Elliot preserve one day by accident, late in the afternoon. I wasn't positive if it was public land or not b/c it's a gravel road....so I was already a little wary about where I was.....and then I come across a street sign that says Murder Creek Trail.....


NOPE.

I pulled a u-turn and headed back to the hard pavement lol!!


I did end up fishing there several times but I always wondered "why in the world would someone name a place that!?"
Ga. had its frontier like Va. as one of the original 13 Colonies and thus lots of Indians covered the region thousands of years before and a few hundred years after the whites showed up.
Indian troubles were the norm for a long period of time as the white man encroached on the red man.
 
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