Planting grasses/cover for quail

Thread starter #1

bnew17

Senior Member
I have a good bit of land that is currently planted in timber. The timber will have its 1st thin in the very near future. I believe the trees are around 15-16 years old now. The land had been in timber for the last 50 + years. Are there any incentive programs/grants/etc that can be applied for to plant habitat for quail? I was thinking after the thinning of timber, maybe planting some broomsedge or Crp? I'm sure others here are more knowledgeable about this than I am. We do have a fair amount of wild quail on the property. Thanks
 

spring

Senior Member
I have a good bit of land that is currently planted in timber. The timber will have its 1st thin in the very near future. I believe the trees are around 15-16 years old now. The land had been in timber for the last 50 + years. Are there any incentive programs/grants/etc that can be applied for to plant habitat for quail? I was thinking after the thinning of timber, maybe planting some broomsedge or Crp? I'm sure others here are more knowledgeable about this than I am. We do have a fair amount of wild quail on the property. Thanks
If you disturb the soil through a combination of discing and burning, I think you’ll find that much of your needed seedbed is there waiting on the opportunity to grow, especially if you thin it enough to allow for the needed sunlight.

In addition, you might want to apply for funding from the Bobwhite Quail Southern Savannah Restoration Project.

As you’ll see, they’ll fund both burning and spraying efforts, but first you’ll want to check and see if you’re in one of targeted Georgia counties. I did this a couple of years ago and it was nice to get funding for efforts I was going to find a way to do anyway.

I’d also reach out to your area Quail Forever biologist. They’re mostly there to help you find the needed landowner projects and efforts for quail management and restoration.

Good luck!
 

Dean

Senior Member
Yep, contact Quail Forever - they can/will help with the assigned farm bill biologist for your area. They can/will come for a site visit, and write up a report of resources available and/or available grants - essentially for some reimbursement of your efforts. These grants can be extremely competitive to get however. But at a minimum should be able to get a biologist to visit.
 
Top