Hunting where there is CWD

Thread starter #1

Ga-Spur

Senior Member
Is there anyone that is planning on hunting an area that is infected with Chronic Wasting Disease or, CWD? Do you plan on eating the venison? Are you carrying some latex gloves with you? I don't believe I would eat a deer in the area that contains CWD without the deer being checked first. JB has a lot of new information on the CWD Forum.
 
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Thread starter #2

Ga-Spur

Senior Member
No one is hunting out west or up north where there is Chronic Wasting Disease or CWD.
 
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D

dave

Guest
Not this year

Ga-Spur said:
Is there anyone that is planning on hunting an area that is infected with Chronic Wasting Disease or, CWD? Do you plan on eating the venison? Are you carrying some latex gloves with you? I don't believe I would eat a deer in the area that contains CWD without the deer being checked first. JB has a lot of new information on the CWD Forum.
After reading a little more about Mad-cow, and the other "prion" diseases, I don't want my family to be test subjects.

I wouldn't eat venison from a state that has a single case of cwd, thereby preventing me from hunting there. :eek:
 

reylamb

Senior Member
There has not been any link between CWD transmission between deer and humans. Even with all of the bunk science out there about CWD no one has shown that link. I know several people in Wisconsin that hunt in the "erradication" zone that still eat venison. I would not worry about it one bit.
 

JBowers

Senior Member
reylamb said:
There has not been any link between CWD transmission between deer and humans. Even with all of the bunk science out there about CWD no one has shown that link. I know several people in Wisconsin that hunt in the "erradication" zone that still eat venison. I would not worry about it one bit.
I understand your point and I would probably eat the deer anyway, but I process my own, debone the carcass and remove certain tissues, etc that might be of concern. However, while there hasn't been a "link" showing transmission of CWD between deer and humans, at the same time there is nothing showing that it isn't possible either. It is a risk. How much of a risk? I don't know. It is a risk for each individual to decide for themself. Also, remember with the "Mad Cow", also a TSE/prion disease like CWD, it was claimed there was no transmission between cattle and humans - that one turned out to be wrong.
 
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