Long term study about coyote effects on deer populations

Thread starter #121
Again I ask: Do you have those studies in PDF form? I am not questioning you, just really curious to read the science... (as if I don't have enough to read already).

I do know that among canids black is a dominant and penetrant gene so crossed with another canid (dog or wolf) that carried that gene ought to result in black hybrids.

Regarding the main study (most issues dealt with in the reply paper), the use of harvest data seems inane, especially if, as I've seen on this forum someone suggest that the average actual reporting is somewhere around 65-75%. I'm no expert, but that's a ton of error variance. Isn't there a UGA study of NoGA deer/fawn recruitment study showing mortality associated with coyote predation?
Again I say, there are several of those studies on the web. Look them up like I did. And I agree about using harvest data as the main indicator of deer populations.
 

Nicodemus

FREELANCE ADMINISTRATOR
Staff member
One important thing to remember, no matter what the critter is. For those of you who want em all gone, you better hope that they are a red wolf, timber wolf, or dog. People of European descent have done a good job of wiping them out since they`ve been on this continent.

Coyotes, on the other hand, thrive in the face of adversity. No matter what man does to them, they just keep on keeping on. If there`s ever a nuclear holocaust or meteor strike, you can bet coyotes will still be here.
 
Isn't there a UGA study of NoGA deer/fawn recruitment study showing mortality associated with coyote predation?
Yes, but no manuscripts have been submitted for publication yet. We are currently capturing does for the final field season. Fawn survival is only 19 to 23%, with predation being the top mortality factor and coyotes being the top predator, closely followed by bears.
 
Coyotes, on the other hand, thrive in the face of adversity. No matter what man does to them, they just keep on keeping on. If there`s ever a nuclear holocaust or meteor strike, you can bet coyotes will still be here.
The truth. Wildfire doesn't slow them down. Actually increases their efficiency.
 

Jim Boyd

Senior Member
To me, this debate is pretty simple.

Far as I am concerned - bears, cats, foxes etc are all indigenous to the south. To me, they are a natural part of nature’s balance.

Coyotes are - again to me, an invasive species.

That said, I shoot every one of them I see and none of the aforementioned species. I have found it very hard to kill them with an arrow, however.

It is that disruption in what I perceive as the natural cycle of things that caused me to have that mindset.

I think too, there is some danger when specific agendas are carried out - such as killing and trapping every coon, cat, fox, etc you can - simply because you treasure and want to promote a turkey population.

IMHO, the right way to go about that is food, cover and habitat.

Each man’s mileage may vary.

For me and my leases - however - coyotes are in danger and foxes, cats, snakes etc are protected.
 
To me, this debate is pretty simple.

Far as I am concerned - bears, cats, foxes etc are all indigenous to the south. To me, they are a natural part of nature’s balance.

Coyotes are - again to me, an invasive species.

That said, I shoot every one of them I see and none of the aforementioned species. I have found it very hard to kill them with an arrow, however.

It is that disruption in what I perceive as the natural cycle of things that caused me to have that mindset.

I think too, there is some danger when specific agendas are carried out - such as killing and trapping every coon, cat, fox, etc you can - simply because you treasure and want to promote a turkey population.

IMHO, the right way to go about that is food, cover and habitat.

Each man’s mileage may vary.

For me and my leases - however - coyotes are in danger and foxes, cats, snakes etc are protected.
It sounded good until you threw the turkey under the bus. lol. Balance is key. The supplemental feed favors the coon. Not much is natural out there anymore. Too much man.
 
Thread starter #128
To me, this debate is pretty simple.

Far as I am concerned - bears, cats, foxes etc are all indigenous to the south. To me, they are a natural part of nature’s balance.

Coyotes are - again to me, an invasive species.

That said, I shoot every one of them I see and none of the aforementioned species. I have found it very hard to kill them with an arrow, however.

It is that disruption in what I perceive as the natural cycle of things that caused me to have that mindset.

I think too, there is some danger when specific agendas are carried out - such as killing and trapping every coon, cat, fox, etc you can - simply because you treasure and want to promote a turkey population.

IMHO, the right way to go about that is food, cover and habitat.

Each man’s mileage may vary.

For me and my leases - however - coyotes are in danger and foxes, cats, snakes etc are protected.
Coyotes are just filling the exact niche that two or three or more species of small native wolves filled before they were (supposedly) extirpated by European settlers. Every book I have that was written by someone about traveling through the southeast back in the 1700s and early 1800s is full of remarks about how the region was absolutely teeming with "droves of wolves" (and deer. )
 
Thread starter #130
It`s ironic that with the rise, or literal return of deer to the South, this critter rose in numbers too. Just something to think about and contemplate.
No niche, no fillers. And nature abhors a vacuum where a niche exists. :)
 
It`s ironic that with the rise, or literal return of deer to the South, this critter rose in numbers too. Just something to think about and contemplate.
I think THAT is the true balance mentioned earlier Nic. If we "manage" the deer, we should also manage the coy-wolf dilemma as aggressively IMHO.
 
Thread starter #135
I think THAT is the true balance mentioned earlier Nic. If we "manage" the deer, we should also manage the coy-wolf dilemma as aggressively IMHO.
I have "managed" quite a few yotes, and will continue to, but I don't have any hatred for them. They are what they are, and are pretty fascinating animals in their own right. Predators are a natural part of deer management. So are we. Like it or not, we are sharing the deer with the coyotes. The coyotes are not going to go away no matter how much we attempt to manage them as long as a prey base exists for them to live on.

My approach is knowing that predation is higher on deer and fawns with coyotes, I have to take care to not over-predate myself. Which may mean not shooting does willy-nilly. I think the lower the deer population, the higher the impacts of predators. If you provide good habitat for wildlife and don't abuse it yourself, you will likely have a sustainable population of not only deer, but other wildlife as well. The deer weren't put here just for us to shoot.
 

Nicodemus

FREELANCE ADMINISTRATOR
Staff member
I think THAT is the true balance mentioned earlier Nic. If we "manage" the deer, we should also manage the coy-wolf dilemma as aggressively IMHO.


I agree. Just as all other critters are managed, but not to the point of extermination. Most don`t believe it, but I see proof that around here they have benefited the turkeys, quail, and other ground nesting birds by keeping smaller predators that do raid nest in check. In spite of the fact that we have an abundance of both canine and feline predators, we also have a healthy population of both turkeys and quail. as do the neighboring plantations. We find deer kills on occasion, but turkey kill findings are nearly nonexistent. We lose more quail to Cooper`s hawks and great horned owls than all other predators combined.
 

GLS

Classic Southern Gentleman
Coyotes Settle the South by John Lane and printed by UGA Press is an interesting read of science and anecdotal stories of the Coyote in the South. One interesting point was a study at the SRP (Bomb Plant) where federal game biologists removed over 500 coyotes from a large area. Pregnant does were captured and implanted with vaginal transmitters that would activate when the fawn was born. Biologists moved quickly to the site and more often than not, evidence that the fawn was killed and eaten by coyotes with dna evidence substantiating coyote presence at the kill. There was no reduction in kills the following year after the 500 were trapped and killed. Another point was made that nature allows the coyote litter to be increased or reduced by the population present. To establish population levels, the response of calls at night to the females calls, lets her know just how many are in the area. The litters can vary from a few pups to 20. Coyotes are omnivores and will eat fallen fruit, typically from a pear or apple tree. And has been noted in another thread on here (maybe elsewhere) that coyotes will often get drunk as goats on fermenting fruit. They are smart and resourceful,and apparently will take a drink every now and then. They can't be all bad. ;) Gil
 
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