The Revolution was like a Civil War!

Thread starter #1
Reading about the siege of Augusta, it occurred to me how much it was like the Civil War in the fact that men from the same country were fighting each other.

I think all the troops at Fort Cornwallis in Augusta were Loyalist. In a way it was Patriots against the Loyalist. In that battle, maybe more battles at the start of the war.

Often lost in a study of the Revolution are the "horrors of civil war" among Americans themselves—among supporters of independence (Patriots/Whigs), opponents (Loyalists/Tories), and the ambivalent Americans who were angry with Britain but opposed to declaring independence.
 

trad bow

Senior Member
Wasn’t that the case on most of the frontier in the southern states? Memory somewhat short at my age but there was a woman who held off some Tories at her home till her husband came back home with several more patriots and hung the Tories.
 

Nicodemus

FREELANCE ADMINISTRATOR
Staff member
It was an ugly war, like they all are. Study up on the British prison ships, and also an englishman name Banastre Tarleton and his raiders.
 
Frontier Georgia was a nightmare with neighbors burning out neighbors. Some of the trouble was about political differences, some about settling old scores. It was a bloody mess.
 
Reading about the siege of Augusta, it occurred to me how much it was like the Civil War in the fact that men from the same country were fighting each other.

I think all the troops at Fort Cornwallis in Augusta were Loyalist. In a way it was Patriots against the Loyalist. In that battle, maybe more battles at the start of the war.

Often lost in a study of the Revolution are the "horrors of civil war" among Americans themselves—among supporters of independence (Patriots/Whigs), opponents (Loyalists/Tories), and the ambivalent Americans who were angry with Britain but opposed to declaring independence.
It was a civil war. We won, unlike the second one. So we got to call it something else.
 

Resica

Senior Member
Almost entirely colonists- the lone exception was Maj Patrick Ferguson, reportedly the best marksman in the British Army
Apparently, he and maybe his Ferguson rifle had an opportunity to shoot a high ranking Colonial on horseback at The Battle of Brandywine. Most folks knowledgeable about those sort of things think it was George Washington. Glad he didn't take the easy shot. I believe he said it was not soldierly to do such.
 
Thread starter #12
Thread starter #14
Wasn’t that the case on most of the frontier in the southern states? Memory somewhat short at my age but there was a woman who held off some Tories at her home till her husband came back home with several more patriots and hung the Tories.
That was Nancy Hart. My daughter and I just randomly passed her place up on the Broad River. Then I was reading about the Battle of Kettle Creek and then the siege of Augusta.
Then noticed the similarities to the Civil War.
 
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