Fly Lines

Thread starter #1
Ok....next question....when looking for a line for trout, is there any lines in particular that you're looking for. I know that you want WFF....and I'm not looking for brands (I use Royal Wulff)....but are there lines that can be used for nymphs, streamers, and dries or are lines specific to each? Thanks!
 

WPrich

Senior Member
Weight forward will handle all the above, but in some instances another type may allow for a better presentation for picky fish. Streamers can be fished on sinktip or full sinking lines to get deeper, and I've read that double tapers may be better for dries.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
A WFF line is all you need for all-around trout fishing. If you do a lot of dry-fly fishing on clear, level water, then a double-tapered line is probably better for a softer presentation. If you chunk a lot of streamers, a sinking-tip line comes in handy. I use a WFF for most of my fishing.
 
Ok....next question....when looking for a line for trout, is there any lines in particular that you're looking for. I know that you want WFF....and I'm not looking for brands (I use Royal Wulff)....but are there lines that can be used for nymphs, streamers, and dries or are lines specific to each? Thanks!
I am going to play devil's advocate here. The best fly line depends on where you are going to be using it. Yes the WFF is a good all around line but if you are never intending on casting beyond 30' to 40' such as what we do here in the Blue Ridge Mtns 95% of the time, I would go with a double taper that way you get 2 fly lines for the price of one. When one side wears out you turn it around and use the other. That's what I use for my all around trout line as I rarely ever see more than 15' of fly line off of my reel in any situation around here.
 
I am going to play devil's advocate here. The best fly line depends on where you are going to be using it. Yes the WFF is a good all around line but if you are never intending on casting beyond 30' to 40' such as what we do here in the Blue Ridge Mtns 95% of the time, I would go with a double taper that way you get 2 fly lines for the price of one. When one side wears out you turn it around and use the other.
But then the line companies get less of your money! How dare you suggest such a thing? ;)
 

GLS

Senior Member
At one time when WFT's weren't capable of roll casting as well as a DT, I went with DT's. DT's take up more reel space than WF lines so sometimes I'd have to cut a DT in half and splice backing to it to get on the particular reel I needed. Presently all of my old Hardy Perfects carry double tapered. The newer (to me) WF lines roll cast fine compared with the older ones. I'll probably re-rig at least one reel for trout with a WF.
 
Top