Stories from the Great Depression of the 1930s

Ruger#3

Senior Member
One of the stories my Pap enjoyed telling was getting a tongue lashing by my Ma to be sure and look for a certain pattern on a feed sack. She needed the sack to finish a dress.

There was little those two didn't know how to do themselves. I cherish my memories of life around them.
 
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Thread starter #42

Milkman

Retired Moderator
This story isnt really related to the depression but it speaks to the times then vs now.

My Daddy used to tell about the "convict camp" that was on his grandfathers farm. In those days the dirt road maintenance was done by prisoners. The county had remote camps around the county so the road crew could spend the night(s) while working in a remote community away from the County prison farm.

Daddy and his brothers were under strict rules to stay away from the convict camp. But as any young boys they didnt always mind. They would sneak and watch the action at the camp. He said they had cages of sorts that they locked some of the convicts in at night. The others were shackled to trees and together.
Much of the road grading equipment in the 1920s was horse drawn. Some of the prisoners were assigned to caring for the horses and mules.

When I came along in the 1950s our family still owned the land. The only thing remaining of the camp was a well.
 

Ruger#3

Senior Member
The habits that generation developed stuck with them for a lifetime. My Ma used stop us kids (50s & 60s), and hand out little buckets as we went to play. "You be sure and pick the berries when your on the hill playing" ,she would say. Everything that was edible went to the table or in a jar.
 
Thread starter #44

Milkman

Retired Moderator
Bump for more stories
 

Crakajak

Senior Member
My granddad had a rolling store outside of Centre Ala. He had a customer that owed him .50 cents and couldn't pay.Customer gave him a H&R single shot 12 gauge full choke, and a box of shells.Granddad said only reason the man traded was he was moving to town and didn't need the gun anymore.My dad killed his first deer with that gun in 1964.
 
Thread starter #46

Milkman

Retired Moderator
The thread in the gardening forum about A family being self sufficient reminded me of something.

My dad told me the during the depression his family would root 3000 sweet potato slips. He said that they gave some to neighbors but they planted the majority for themselves I wish I could remember how many acres it was. When I was into gardening 50 was more than I wanted to mess with.

My daddy passed away 24 years ago today and I still wish I could get some of that sage advice and memories.
 
I think many people survived off of sweet potatoes in the 20's and 30's. My Dad talked about going over their tater banks again and again looking for a few more taters towards the end of winter.
 
Probably towards the end of the depression but my Dad sold fish. He would order a barrel of fish from Savannah packed in ice. It would come by train to Uvalda and he would load it up in the back of his truck and haul it all through the countryside to sell. He had scales and sold it by the pound. It would always be a little of whatever was caught off the cost.
I asked him what did he do with the fish that didn't sell? He said they ate them.
 
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