Can anyone tell me anything about this gun?

Thread starter #1

NCMTNHunter

Senior Member
5313858B-2BA6-45B9-84E6-C44421AE7A5D.jpeg EFAA9340-F69E-453E-8562-4EC8219A67E4.jpeg This gun belongs to my wife’s grandmother. Her family is not hunters or gun people so I was surprised when she told me tonight that she had a civil war musket that she inherited from her grandfather. I thought it was some kind of replica but I plugged the stamped info into google and found several for sale that also claim to be civil war muskets. Is this thing legit or is it a replica?
 
Looks legit to me.
By the corrosion on the nipple I would say it is old enough. Fulmanated mercury caps caused this. It is a military musket and the age is right so I would say probably. How does the bore look? many of these were bored to be a smoothbore after the war to make them more useful to civilians
 
Thread starter #5

NCMTNHunter

Senior Member
By the corrosion on the nipple I would say it is old enough. Fulmanated mercury caps caused this. It is a military musket and the age is right so I would say probably. How does the bore look? many of these were bored to be a smoothbore after the war to make them more useful to civilians
The room they keep it in was pretty dark. I had to use the flash to get these pictures. The end of the muzzle was pretty corroded but didn’t notice any rifling.
 

fishfryer

Senior Member
View attachment 997544 View attachment 997545 This gun belongs to my wife’s grandmother. Her family is not hunters or gun people so I was surprised when she told me tonight that she had a civil war musket that she inherited from her grandfather. I thought it was some kind of replica but I plugged the stamped info into google and found several for sale that also claim to be civil war muskets. Is this thing legit or is it a replica?
I'm not offering advise,but if that rifle was in my family or belonged to someone I could talk to without making someone mad,I'd play amateur detective. I'd play twenty questions until I ran out of breath, or got told to shut up and set down. That grandmother is the key to that mystery, probably the only one.
 
Thread starter #10
I'm not offering advise,but if that rifle was in my family or belonged to someone I could talk to without making someone mad,I'd play amateur detective. I'd play twenty questions until I ran out of breath, or got told to shut up and set down. That grandmother is the key to that mystery, probably the only one.
Unfortunately all she knows is that her grandfather left it to her and told her it was a civil war musket. There is no one alive that knows where it came from.
 
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Ruger#3

RAMBLIN MOD
Staff member
Sounds like yours....

U.S. Model 1861 Rifle-Musket, E. Robinson Contract, .58 Caliber, Paper Cartridge, Percussion Manufactured by Edward Robinson, New York City, ca. 1863–64. Total production: 30,000. Overall length: 56". Weight: 9 lbs. 2 oz. Muzzleloader, single shot, three band. The Markings on this rifle musket are of the second 1864 version (last 18,000 examples) with “E. ROBINSON” in an arc over “NEW YORK” below bolster cutout; a spread eagle over “U.S.” at center of lock plate; and “1864” to rear of lock plate. Generally in good to very good condition with original ramrod and other furniture, has sling mount on second band and original butt-plate intact. The Standard Catalog of Civil War Firearms – John F. Graf: Prices this gun from $900 to $2750 depending on condition. Date: 19th Century
 

Ruger#3

RAMBLIN MOD
Staff member
ROBINSON, E.— New York, N. Y. Edward Robinson, Civil War con tractor for Springfield muskets, Model 1861: - June 10, 1863-20,000 at $20.00; 12,000 delivered. Dec. 29, 1863-5,000 at $18.00; 4,000 delivered. Feb. 23, 1864-15,000 at $18.00; 8,000 delivered. Oct. 4, 1864-7,000 at $18.00; 6,000 delivered.
 

DAVE

Senior Member
It looks like an original but from the picture it looks like it is missing original rear site that had two leafs, is the sight broke off? The birds head also looks funny but may be from wear.
 

Ruger#3

RAMBLIN MOD
Staff member
This will help show what DAVE is commenting on.
3CE14EBF-5740-43CF-B42C-320ECABC61F7.jpeg
 
Thread starter #15
4BD5D26A-F55D-4C45-914B-C4971C798032.jpeg It’s hard to see but it has a small fixed rear sight. It almost looks like it has been ground down. There is barely a notch left in it.
 
Is the something that lets you know that it’s a yankee gun other than the US stamp?
Before the War started The US mfgd. rifled muskets at Springfeld Armory and, I think, at Harper's Ferry Armory. Harper's Ferry was in a very exposed position to we Southerners and Springfield could not produce the numbers that were needed to arm Uncle Abraham's hoards of invaders. The US let contracts for muskets in the Springfield pattern to several makers. This one is stamped NY, therefore, a Yankee rifle unless it's coat was turned for it.

Side note; Harper's' Ferry changed hands several times during the War. The South went to war with what it had and many were armed with flintlocks or whatever they brought from home. The Southern Army in the Virginia was not completely armed with modern weapons until Harper's Ferry was captured a couple of days before the Battle of Antietam late in 1862. We lost a GG-Uncle in Crampton's Gap on South Mountain who was protecting McLaws' rear while he was assisting with the capture.
 
It’s hard to see but it has a small fixed rear sight. It almost looks like it has been ground down. There is barely a notch left in it.
That notch was likely put in there by a subsequent owner. The original rifle would have has a rear sight that could be adjusted to 500 yards or so.
 
Thread starter #19
Before the War started The US mfgd. rifled muskets at Springfeld Armory and, I think, at Harper's Ferry Armory. Harper's Ferry was in a very exposed position to we Southerners and Springfield could not produce the numbers that were needed to arm Uncle Abraham's hoards of invaders. The US let contracts for muskets in the Springfield pattern to several makers. This one is stamped NY, therefore, a Yankee rifle unless it's coat was turned for it.

Side note; Harper's' Ferry changed hands several times during the War. The South went to war with what it had and many were armed with flintlocks or whatever they brought from home. The Southern Army in the Virginia was not completely armed with modern weapons until Harper's Ferry was captured a couple of days before the Battle of Antietam late in 1862. We lost a GG-Uncle in Crampton's Gap on South Mountain who was protecting McLaws' rear while he was assisting with the capture.
That’s interesting. She was born and raised in Altoona Pennsylvania so there is really no reason it wouldn’t be a yankee gun. Thanks for the info.
 
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