Cable saw for pelvic bone

Jack Straw

Senior Member
Thread starter #1
Has anyone tried one of these for splitting pelvics? How well did it work? I'm also wondering if it is the same thing as a PVC cable saw which can be found at home improvement stores for a third of the cost of a cable saw out of a hunting catalog. Oh sure, you don't get the nice camo pouch to carry it in...
 

NOYDB

Senior Member
#2
Shhh! You're giving away their gimmick.

How could you possibly carry it in anything other than a camo pouch. Why if it weren't camo, the deer would see it right inside your pocket or pack.....

Oh.. they do work, both kinds.
 
#3
I don't split the pelvis for three reasons. One, it's a pain in the butt. Two, it leaves bone dust on the meat which I've heard causes the meat in that area to taste bad. Three, I don't have to remove the bladder or the rectum.

I remove the hams from the pelvis by following the bone and disjointing the ball and socket joints.
 

Jack Straw

Senior Member
Thread starter #5
I don't split the pelvis for three reasons. One, it's a pain in the butt. Two, it leaves bone dust on the meat which I've heard causes the meat in that area to taste bad. Three, I don't have to remove the bladder or the rectum.

I remove the hams from the pelvis by following the bone and disjointing the ball and socket joints.
I certainly agree with reasons #1 and 3 above, but I have never heard of #2. However, it sounds like you process your own which I don't do. Does this technique work well for field dressing only?
 

7Mag Hunter

Senior Member
#7
Same as Dead Eye Eddy...Why go to the trouble and contaminate
the meat with bone dust and bone marrow....
After removing the backstraps, make a simple/single cut around
the ham, and cut the small flap of cartilage holding the ball in the
socket.....
 

Jack Straw

Senior Member
Thread starter #9
but do you want to be the first case?
Only if it involves a long series of painful shots...:eek:

How else can you field dress one without breaking the pelvic? That's the way I learned it and everyone I have hunted with has done that, but I am certainly open to new ideas.
 
#11
I have field dressed numerous deer and have never split the pelvis. You can remove the bladder and rectum by cutting around them from the outside and pulling them through the inside. It takes a little patience to not bust anything. I have read good things about the new "Butt Out" tool that Walmart sells for $10, but I haven't used it.
 

dawg2

AWOL ADMINISTRATOR
#12
Risk of human prion diseases is very low.
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol10no6/03-1082.htm

I'd rather have a little "bone dust" in the carcass' anal cavity than a burst bladder or colon. Which contaminates the most?
The dust is gone with a quick rinse of clean water.
Not Prion disease. Takes a little more than water to get that off. It's called a funeral, and they run about $5,000-$6,000. And if you have seen the footage of people with it, it is pretty awful.

If you are taking it to a processor, you can cut a circle around the anus and genitals and reach in from the belly (once it's cleared out) and grab as far as you can, keeping the bladder pinched, and pull it into and then out of the gut cavity and toss it. Urine is sterile unless the deer is sick.

Prion disease is rare but I am not even going to play around with that. Cutting a pelvis can give you one more way to cut your hand as well.

If you do it yourself, bone it out.
 

WTM45

Senior Member
#13
If you are telling me to bone it out, you are preaching to the choir.:rofl:
How do you think I can bring home to CT a deer I shoot over in NY?
I bone it out in the woods at my truck. And I am well practiced at it.

Studies have been conducted showing a strong chance that even the urine and feces carries prions in infected deer.

So, the point of not cutting the pelvis is not supported by the risk of contracting a prion disease. That can occur without direct contact with a carcass, and only consumption of prepared venison.
The risk is low. That argument is moot.
Not cutting the pelvis to prevent getting cuts on the hands is an excellent argument!

Honestly, the bladder and anus needs not be removed at all if quartering/deboning is to be conducted. Opening the abdominal cavity is only necessary to take out the tenderloins.
 

skeeterbit

Senior Member
#14
I don't split the pelvis for three reasons. One, it's a pain in the butt. Two, it leaves bone dust on the meat which I've heard causes the meat in that area to taste bad. Three, I don't have to remove the bladder or the rectum.

I remove the hams from the pelvis by following the bone and disjointing the ball and socket joints.
Hey Dead Eye Eddy I used to hunt with some guys that did it that way but cant seem to remember exactly way they did it! You dont know by chance if theres something showing you how to do it?
 
#15
Honestly, the bladder and anus needs not be removed at all if quartering/deboning is to be conducted. Opening the abdominal cavity is only necessary to take out the tenderloins.
i agree...although I do field dress deer,

I was taught from the beginning that I had to get the bladder and anus out of the deer due to spoilage, bad taste etc etc. then I met up with bubbabuck and May and they had never taken it out...and have killed hundreds of deer. So I tried it and walllaaaa I have not taken one out in about 6 years
 

Tenkiller

Senior Member
#16
My brother in law uses a folding camp saw, also found at your local Wal mart, he loves it and won't use anything else.
 

dawg2

AWOL ADMINISTRATOR
#17
If you are telling me to bone it out, you are preaching to the choir.:rofl:
How do you think I can bring home to CT a deer I shoot over in NY?
I bone it out in the woods at my truck. And I am well practiced at it.

Studies have been conducted showing a strong chance that even the urine and feces carries prions in infected deer.

So, the point of not cutting the pelvis is not supported by the risk of contracting a prion disease. That can occur without direct contact with a carcass, and only consumption of prepared venison.
The risk is low. That argument is moot.
Not cutting the pelvis to prevent getting cuts on the hands is an excellent argument!

Honestly, the bladder and anus needs not be removed at all if quartering/deboning is to be conducted. Opening the abdominal cavity is only necessary to take out the tenderloins.

I just get the tenderloins and bone the rest.
 

dawg2

AWOL ADMINISTRATOR
#18
Do tell us the secret:huh:
 

dawg2

AWOL ADMINISTRATOR
#19
What ahppened to the guy said he had a secret to getting the backstraps? Must have gotten banned? That was quick, jeez.
 

WTM45

Senior Member
#20
Are you talking about the true tenderloins, or the backstraps?
You can get the tenderloins out without opening the abdominal cavity. It involves removing the backstraps first.
 
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