Millennials, who owns them.

NOYDB

Senior Member
But they can vote!
 

Batjack

member #1313
My dear niece (with a diploma from a school I'll not mention) lives 20 miles from her Grand Mother's house. All she has to do is take a left out of her apartment complex, drive for 19 1/2 miles and take the next left after crossing the county line, then 1/2 mile and take a left into the drive way. SIMPLE! Can't manage it with out her phone telling her the directions STEP BY STEP! And she grew up in the house I'm talk'n about.
WHEN there is a "zombie" problem, it'll be her and all the rest of this generation walk'n the planet in droves TAKING what they need and can't supply for them selves.
 

NOYDB

Senior Member
I can cook Mac & Cheese all by myself.
 

Patriot44

Senior Member
My dear niece (with a diploma from a school I'll not mention) lives 20 miles from her Grand Mother's house. All she has to do is take a left out of her apartment complex, drive for 19 1/2 miles and take the next left after crossing the county line, then 1/2 mile and take a left into the drive way. SIMPLE! Can't manage it with out her phone telling her the directions STEP BY STEP! And she grew up in the house I'm talk'n about.
WHEN there is a "zombie" problem, it'll be her and all the rest of this generation walk'n the planet in droves TAKING what they need and can't supply for them selves.
When I joined the Army, I joined technical which is a six year commitment. Somehow, I ended up with a three year contract and after signing, they tried to renege but I stuck to my guns and they let me in. Knowing that I could never make E5 and I really had no desire to do so, the Army was a party for me, well, for the most part.

When I was ETS'ing, my TS clearance was removed and I was placed into supply (best job ever, one day I was calculating ground speeds and trajectory and the next I was handing out toilet paper :bounce:). During that time, my 1SGT assigned me to train all of the E4P's and CPL's on the LNC in preparation for PLDC. So I did and I loved it. BTW, land nav in the desert is crazy difficult so I loved it even more.

I have had an infatuation with maps and direction my entire life. As a kid, fellow buddies and I would stare at maps for hours looking for a way to head north on horse and hunt Appalachia.

I am not sure to this day why I was selected to train my superiors on land nav, but I suppose it was because I was good at it. What they had no idea was that having grown up in a swamp, if you couldn't figure your way around and use a compass, you were gator meat. :bounce:
 
When were were going on a trip, my Dad had us boys grab a map and pick the best route. Probably when the three of us were 10-12 and early teens.
Dad would look at our choice and usually agree. We would then look at the map and navigate from the back seat. We also learned that 3 rights make a left. That comes in handy in a big city.
 
we home schooled our girls , when my oldest was 13 she said she wanted to make some money, so she got up at 5 am and cooked my breakfast for a few months.
the best 10 dollars a day I have ever spent.
when my 17 yr old was living 7 hours away from home going to the Ramp school of ministry , she called me one day and said thank you , I'm with 4 girls with a flat tire and none but me knows how to change a tire.
 

NOYDB

Senior Member

sinclair1

Senior Member
There will be some smart ones out there that see what's on the table. While most will go to college for basket weaving, there will be several porstaffers who make D+ but scrap up through the trades.
The smart kids will claim to be all smart for years and regurgitate junk they read in science weekly, while making a welders fries, but all the money will be made by plumbers and welders in 2030.
 
There will be some smart ones out there that see what's on the table. While most will go to college for basket weaving, there will be several porstaffers who make D+ but scrap up through the trades.
The smart kids will claim to be all smart for years and regurgitate junk they read in science weekly, while making a welders fries, but all the money will be made by plumbers and welders in 2030.
The world only needs so may cell phone salesmen.
 
There is nothing wrong with learning skills for whatever career one seeks. I think the OP was seeing that the young people didn't develop the basic skills we did or skills needed for everyday living.

Just the basic skills such as reading a multi-meter, a 12V trouble light, putting a chain back on a bicycle, changing a light switch, removing a nut from a bolt, changing/patching the inner tube in a bicycle tire, kitchen safety, money management, insurance info, how to do your income taxes, balancing a check book, decision making, etc.

Maybe some father and son, or even father and daughter hobbies such as camping/backpacking that forces the child to make decisions. Should we go this way or that way? Should we camp here or here? Should we eat this or this? What about this stove or this tent?
Did you plan the meals? Did you plan our route? Did you check the weather? Did you bring taters?
 

sinclair1

Senior Member
There is nothing wrong with learning skills for whatever career one seeks. I think the OP was seeing that the young people didn't develop the basic skills we did or skills needed for everyday living.

Just the basic skills such as reading a multi-meter, a 12V trouble light, putting a chain back on a bicycle, changing a light switch, removing a nut from a bolt, changing/patching the inner tube in a bicycle tire, kitchen safety, money management, insurance info, how to do your income taxes, balancing a check book, decision making, etc.

Maybe some father and son, or even father and daughter hobbies such as camping/backpacking that forces the child to make decisions. Should we go this way or that way? Should we camp here or here? Should we eat this or this? What about this stove or this tent?
Did you plan the meals? Did you plan our route? Did you check the weather? Did you bring taters?
That's true. I didn't learn all my skills from my dad, but out of necessity. He was gone a lot and if the go cart didn't run, I either fixed it or rode my bike. If the bike was broke I fixed it or rode a skateboard. If I was hungry I made a grilled cheese or starved to death.
My point is we as humans have the ability, but parents just do for them until they are helpless worthless pond scum
The best thing that ever happened to me was to have crappy parents as far as nurturing is concerned. I brought myself up and could sew stitches, cook and keep chores up to date, not because they expected it, but because I did.
 
When were were going on a trip, my Dad had us boys grab a map and pick the best route. Probably when the three of us were 10-12 and early teens.
Dad would look at our choice and usually agree. We would then look at the map and navigate from the back seat. We also learned that 3 rights make a left. That comes in handy in a big city.
That reminded me of something in my recent past, 2-3 years ago, I travel for my job mostly on the road regionally with some younger generation fellows. Good boys, but just don't really have a clue as far as the real world, IMO.

For instance, we were traveling somewhere on the interstate system and I was driving, I usually do most of it, and knowing where to go without GPS came up in a coverstion in the car.

Anyway, I made the statement that as Long as I know where a location is in relation to where I am, I can drive to it using the Interstate system and only the Big green interstate signs along the way. They all laughed and said, "No way, how could you do that without a map or GPS?" I said, "because I know my Geography, and y'all have been in this car for 3 hours and basically have no idea where we are right now, or how far it is to our next route to the destination".

It got real quiet for a minute or two and they started looking for the next big green sign. :rofl:
 
That reminded me of something in my recent past, 2-3 years ago, I travel for my job mostly on the road regionally with some younger generation fellows. Good boys, but just don't really have a clue as far as the real world, IMO.

For instance, we were traveling somewhere on the interstate system and I was driving, I usually do most of it, and knowing where to go without GPS came up in a coverstion in the car.

Anyway, I made the statement that as Long as I know where a location is in relation to where I am, I can drive to it using the Interstate system and only the Big green interstate signs along the way. They all laughed and said, "No way, how could you do that without a map or GPS?" I said, "because I know my Geography, and y'all have been in this car for 3 hours and basically have no idea where we are right now, or how far it is to our next route to the destination".

It got real quiet for a minute or two and they started looking for the next big green sign. :rofl:
Yep, back in the day one would at least look at a map and know the general location you were headed. You'd know you weren't suppose to go all the way to North Carolina.
You would know what the big green signs mean. Most cars now have compasses. Do people ever look at them?

Even though we now have GPS, I still like to look at a map and see where I'm going. I will also look at Google satellite view if taking a back way. Turn at the Church, the old farm house, the Hardee's, etc.
To burn that image in my mind maybe. If it's a short trip, I probably won't even use GPS.
I like using both, it just goes back to the time before GPS.
 
That's true. I didn't learn all my skills from my dad, but out of necessity. He was gone a lot and if the go cart didn't run, I either fixed it or rode my bike. If the bike was broke I fixed it or rode a skateboard. If I was hungry I made a grilled cheese or starved to death.
My point is we as humans have the ability, but parents just do for them until they are helpless worthless pond scum
The best thing that ever happened to me was to have crappy parents as far as nurturing is concerned. I brought myself up and could sew stitches, cook and keep chores up to date, not because they expected it, but because I did.
I can see that. My wife was more raised like you, to fend for herself. Neither parent offering much guidance. She had to develop certain survival skills.

I was raised where we had but I still had to learn skills. If the moped didn't run, you rode your bike, if it had a flat tire, you walked. That progressed into automobiles as well.
If you wanted something, you worked for it. Either to make money to get it or to fix it yourself. Boats, outboard motors, motorcycles, stereos, or whatever.
We were just taught to be more of a DIY mentality. Change your own oil, fix your own flat, paint your own room, build your own gun cabinet, build a cricket box, grunt your own worms, cut your own firewood, rake your own yard, wax your own car, clean your guns, clean your reels, clean your paint brushes and rollers, build your own shed, enclose your own carport, etc.

Either way whether of necessity or made to do it, we did it.
 

fireman32

Senior Member
My two boys are homeschooled, they can cook, clean and help with oil changes and basic electrical and plumbing problems that sometimes arise. They know how to plant seeds and clean deer and fish.
They are now 11 and 13. The greatest accomplishment so far is that the oldest can cook minute rice in 57 seconds.
 

sinclair1

Senior Member
I can see that. My wife was more raised like you, to fend for herself. Neither parent offering much guidance. She had to develop certain survival skills.

I was raised where we had but I still had to learn skills. If the moped didn't run, you rode your bike, if it had a flat tire, you walked. That progressed into automobiles as well.
If you wanted something, you worked for it. Either to make money to get it or to fix it yourself. Boats, outboard motors, motorcycles, stereos, or whatever.
We were just taught to be more of a DIY mentality. Change your own oil, fix your own flat, paint your own room, build your own gun cabinet, build a cricket box, grunt your own worms, cut your own firewood, rake your own yard, wax your own car, clean your guns, clean your reels, clean your paint brushes and rollers, build your own shed, enclose your own carport, etc.

Either way whether of necessity or made to do it, we did it.
I still live that way. Change my oil, do my own yard etc. so many think it's a sign of success to pay to have homesteading chores handled for them. Maybe they are right and I am just frugal. My wife mentions maids, car detailers and lawn services at times. I just can't pay for those things. seems lazy
 

sinclair1

Senior Member
I have a special needs niece that will never leave home, but I was shocked at this. 34 years old!!! Really
Experts say millennials are behind on these skills because many haven't left childhood homes. The U.S. Census Bureau said in 2015, 34 percent of Americans between 18 and 34 still lived with a parent. That's compared to just 26 percent in 2005.
 
There was a time in history not that long ago where it was fairly common for offspring to live at home all the way up until they marry. Even then that didn't guarantee they leave the farm...
 
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