Biscuits

Thread starter #1
Looking for a good biscuit recipe, my aunt used to make them when I was down in college living with her but never really stopped to learn. Definitely regretting it now.
 

Havana Dude

Senior Member
A good place to start is get you a bag of white Lilly SR flour. Go by the recipe on the back. A few tips to help you, use a couple butter knives criss crossing to cut in your shortening. If you cut your biscuits, don’t twist cutter. For me, the wetter your dough is coming out of bowl, the better. It will tighten up as you add flour to aid in working dough. I flatten out my dough ball by hand to about an inch, and fold in half, repeat about 4-5 times. Flatten out last time to a half to 3/4” thick. 500 degrees for 10 minutes. I melt a half a stick of butter and drizzle over mine right when they come out. Remove from hot pan, so they don’t continue to cook. That basically how I do it. There are a million ways to do it, you just have to find what works for you.
 

gobbleinwoods

Keeper of the Magic Word
I use either King Arthur or Gold Medal self rising flour. Then work my shortening in using my fingers. I don't measure the shortening any more but the use more than you think you need. I then pour in the buttermilk (again I don't measure) but as Havana said you want a slightly sticky dough. I gently stir mine with a fork but traditionalists will tell you to use your hand. You just don't want to do this with vigor but gently. Turn out onto a floured surface and pat and flatten, fold--flatten to about an inch and repeat 5-6 times. Cut with a floured biscuit cutter but do NOT twist the cutter in the dough. I bake mine at 350 for 18-20 minutes as the wife really likes the tops to be brown.

There are lots of recipes on King Arthur website to give you other options and idea about flour to shortening ratios.
 

fishfryer

Senior Member
A good place to start is get you a bag of white Lilly SR flour. Go by the recipe on the back. A few tips to help you, use a couple butter knives criss crossing to cut in your shortening. If you cut your biscuits, don’t twist cutter. For me, the wetter your dough is coming out of bowl, the better. It will tighten up as you add flour to aid in working dough. I flatten out my dough ball by hand to about an inch, and fold in half, repeat about 4-5 times. Flatten out last time to a half to 3/4” thick. 500 degrees for 10 minutes. I melt a half a stick of butter and drizzle over mine right when they come out. Remove from hot pan, so they don’t continue to cook. That basically how I do it. There are a million ways to do it, you just have to find what works for you.
I've seen reports that White Lily has a new owner and will be made in another location. My family has been using White Lily for at least three generations hope to continue,depending on flour quality.
 

gobbleinwoods

Keeper of the Magic Word
Another hint. You can buy the crisco in the flat tubs that make measuring it easier without messing up a measuring cup.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
White Lily self-rising. Get you about three cups of it. Put about three tablespoons of Crisco or a little bit more in there. Crumble it into the flour with your fingers until it's mixed throughout it and there are no big chunks left. Add buttermilk and stir with a spoon until it's a little stickier than you would think. Turn it out on a floured board. Don't knead it or work it too much, just enough to make it smooth. Mash it out about 1/2"-3/4" thick, and cut your biscuits out with a wide-mouth mason jar lid. It doesn't matter at all if you twist it or not. Put them in a greased pan so that they're touching and bake at 425*. Run a stick of butter over the tops. It takes a few times to get the feel of it, but it's super easy.

biscuits.jpg
 

gobbleinwoods

Keeper of the Magic Word
Now my MIL used to make a water biscuit and they were good.

She never measured anything except by feel.

She used the cheapest self rising flour but usually White Lily and then sifted in dry/powered milk. Then by hand shortening. When it was crumbly add the water by hand and then using just her floured hands would roll a biscuit at a time between her palms. Then she sprayed the tops with Pam or dabbed on some butter although I think she used CrockSpread.
 

Havana Dude

Senior Member
Yep, see what I mean? Take the advice you think will work for you and give it a whirl. I know an elderly lady, who mixes in bacon grease. I can hurt myself eating her biscuits. NCHB, those look awesome!
 
My mother's sisters,there were four of them and my mother, all from same parents,raised together, all made different tasting biscuits. They were all good too.
Yep. I learned to make them from my mom. I taught my wife how to make them. We all make good biscuits, but they are all subtly different.

Here's some my wife made this morning. They were good.

biscuits.jpg
 
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SC Hunter

Senior Member
Of all the things I've learned to cook during my short life on this planet I've never made homemade biscuits. I am going to have to change that soon.
 
There is a local eating place here that makes buttermilk biscuts. They have a real good tang to them. WHen i make buttermilk biscuts they dont have the same flavor. Is there something else that gives some buttermilk biscuts more flavor than others?
 
I make mine exactly like NChb except I don't roll my dough out and cut it. I GENTLY roll it in my hands and GENTLY pat it flat like you would pat a babies bottom. Put them on a baking sheet sides touching. Mama always pushed the biscuits down with 3 fingers before putting them in the oven. Don't know why, but that's what I do.
 
My kids asked me last night if Nana made biscuits when I was growing up. I said no, she didn't know how. My wife said her Mom didn't know how either but it didn't stop her from making them.:LOL:
 
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