Sawmill wood processing Blairsville/Blue Ridge???

Stang

Senior Member
I thought is might be to keep the heat down to prevent a fire? I know it isn't a compost pile but with logs stacked like that, does it create heat and a concern for fire? or just slow down the drying out process?
 

Timberman

Senior Member
It slows the drying process and prevents stain. On grade lumber you can't have stain. Logs stain quickly especially in the summer. Plus it helps wash dirt off the logs keeping dust down and saws sharper longer, and will make the chips and bark weigh more...
 
Thread starter #23

Flash

Senior Member
It slows the drying process and prevents stain. On grade lumber you can't have stain. Logs stain quickly especially in the summer. Plus it helps wash dirt off the logs keeping dust down and saws sharper longer, and will make the chips and bark weigh more...
These trees IMO looked too small for lumber
What's the purpose of making them weigh more, like a cow get more money???
 
Thanks to Flash for starting this thread as I have enjoyed it.

I REALLY HOPE THAT YOU TAKE TIME TO READ ALL OF THIS BECAUSE YOU WILL BE AMAZED AT THE TECHNOLOGY THAT IS ALL ROUND YOU....BUT YOU NEVER REALIZED IT.


I am also glad that some of you have put links in your posts on this thread and I hope that lots of you will click on the links and take some extra time reading about this Company to see exactly what these workers accomplish on a daily basis.

When you click on the link supplied by J_seph in post # 10 and take a virtual tour of this manufacturing plant, you will be amazed about how this operation is sequenced for maximum efficiency. What most of you don't see is just how the safety factors in this type operation have been built into their manufacturing process and with the proper training, every employee understands their role in making sure that it happens just as smoothly as each one of us take another breath each day.

If you look inside this plant, you will see lots of shiny ductwork with various "pick-up points" that begins in the early stages of this process and continues along until they have a finished product. If you notice, the work area air looks to be very clean as that are no dust particles just floating around to hinder their employees. All of this ductwork has various "pick-up points" throughout the plant and all of that ductwork ultimately ends up in a big tan-colored dust collector on the outside of the building that happens to be the tallest structure on this plantsite. It is round and has a cone-shaped hopper on the bottom portion of it.

What most of you don't realize is that this type dust collector can have anywhere from 72 to over 1000 or more filter bags inside that are about 5"-6" diameter and up to 12-14 feet long. There are metal filter cages that these fabric filter bags fit onto and this is what keeps them staying in a cylindrical shape while the filtering process takes place every minute of the work shift. Lots of these filter bags can last for several years before needing to be replaced. These systems have automatic "back-pulse" cleaning systems in place that lets the dust fall down into the hopper and it is transferred into a recycle container. In many applications, this collected dust can also be recycled into various other things and it is also used in "hog-fueled" boiler operations as a fuel source for manufacturing plants.

I have worked exclusively in the Filtration Industry for the past 48 years now and I have owned my business for the past 28 years. My entire 48 year work career has been involved with supplying the necessary filter bags and metal filter cages for these type systems that are used worldwide in various types of manufacturing plants. I am considering retiring in the near future and I am working out a continuation agreement with some other qualified personnel so they can continue to supply this "required usage items" of various filtration systems.

Many years ago, I also supplied all of the filters that were used in the Jack Daniel's Distillery in Lynchburg, Tennessee. What most people don't realize is that most every manufacturing facility is required to have some type of filtration systems in their operations.

Lots of you have most probably used some of my filters BUT never even thought about the use of them. If you have ever taken an acetaminophen pill (since late 1970's) or maybe drank any type of soft drink or even eaten anything with corn starch or corn syrup in it, then you have probably used some of my filters during the original manufacturing process. I have supplied very specialized filters in the corn processing industry and in a soft drink, carbonated water is the first ingredient and "high fructose corn syrup" is normally the second ingredient.

I am hoping that by sharing this information with others, you can now realize just how each thing in life has evolved all around us........and like the late Paul Harvey was accustomed to saying....NOW YOU KNOW THE REST OF THE STORY !!!
 

Crakajak

Daily Driveler News Team
Thanks to Flash for starting this thread as I have enjoyed it.

I REALLY HOPE THAT YOU TAKE TIME TO READ ALL OF THIS BECAUSE YOU WILL BE AMAZED AT THE TECHNOLOGY THAT IS ALL ROUND YOU....BUT YOU NEVER REALIZED IT.


I am also glad that some of you have put links in your posts on this thread and I hope that lots of you will click on the links and take some extra time reading about this Company to see exactly what these workers accomplish on a daily basis.

When you click on the link supplied by J_seph in post # 10 and take a virtual tour of this manufacturing plant, you will be amazed about how this operation is sequenced for maximum efficiency. What most of you don't see is just how the safety factors in this type operation have been built into their manufacturing process and with the proper training, every employee understands their role in making sure that it happens just as smoothly as each one of us take another breath each day.

If you look inside this plant, you will see lots of shiny ductwork with various "pick-up points" that begins in the early stages of this process and continues along until they have a finished product. If you notice, the work area air looks to be very clean as that are no dust particles just floating around to hinder their employees. All of this ductwork has various "pick-up points" throughout the plant and all of that ductwork ultimately ends up in a big tan-colored dust collector on the outside of the building that happens to be the tallest structure on this plantsite. It is round and has a cone-shaped hopper on the bottom portion of it.

What most of you don't realize is that this type dust collector can have anywhere from 72 to over 1000 or more filter bags inside that are about 5"-6" diameter and up to 12-14 feet long. There are metal filter cages that these fabric filter bags fit onto and this is what keeps them staying in a cylindrical shape while the filtering process takes place every minute of the work shift. Lots of these filter bags can last for several years before needing to be replaced. These systems have automatic "back-pulse" cleaning systems in place that lets the dust fall down into the hopper and it is transferred into a recycle container. In many applications, this collected dust can also be recycled into various other things and it is also used in "hog-fueled" boiler operations as a fuel source for manufacturing plants.

I have worked exclusively in the Filtration Industry for the past 48 years now and I have owned my business for the past 28 years. My entire 48 year work career has been involved with supplying the necessary filter bags and metal filter cages for these type systems that are used worldwide in various types of manufacturing plants. I am considering retiring in the near future and I am working out a continuation agreement with some other qualified personnel so they can continue to supply this "required usage items" of various filtration systems.

Many years ago, I also supplied all of the filters that were used in the Jack Daniel's Distillery in Lynchburg, Tennessee. What most people don't realize is that most every manufacturing facility is required to have some type of filtration systems in their operations.

Lots of you have most probably used some of my filters BUT never even thought about the use of them. If you have ever taken an acetaminophen pill (since late 1970's) or maybe drank any type of soft drink or even eaten anything with corn starch or corn syrup in it, then you have probably used some of my filters during the original manufacturing process. I have supplied very specialized filters in the corn processing industry and in a soft drink, carbonated water is the first ingredient and "high fructose corn syrup" is normally the second ingredient.

I am hoping that by sharing this information with others, you can now realize just how each thing in life has evolved all around us........and like the late Paul Harvey was accustomed to saying....NOW YOU KNOW THE REST OF THE STORY !!!
We had 144 bags 10' long we ran in a 36,000 cfm dust collector.That thing could pull the horns off a billy goat.
 

tr21

Senior Member
from my understanding soaking oak logs destresses the wood. i once asked a old timer what the white thin strands were in the grain as we were splitting oak firewood. he said it happens as the stress in the grain works itself out. he also explained to me that for high end oak wood, the mill would soak logs in a long tub of water to destress it so that after sawing was much less likely to warp and split . that mill makes whiskey barrels and a split or warp in that is real bad ! so that mill has logs stacked and just always sprays them because they would need a lake to soak them in with all the wood they go through...
 
Thread starter #29

Flash

Senior Member
NGSportsman;

I think I was mistaken. They have a cooperage, but it is in Kentucky. They buy white oak logs. I think in Blue Ridge, they are processing the logs into staves and kiln drying, then shipping to Kentucky. I looked at their FB page and they were hiring a kiln operator. Here's a link to their website.

https://www.robinsonstave.com/
They didn't look that big, is there an area that they grow white oak, like southern pine, then harvest in 10 or so yrs?? Or was the 'poles' cut from big trees some how??
 
white oak is probably a 60 to 80 year minimum harvest. They just don't grow that fast
 
Thread starter #31

Flash

Senior Member
white oak is probably a 60 to 80 year minimum harvest. They just don't grow that fast
From my view they looked the size of one I planted 15-20 yrs ago. When I run out of things to do I might call the company and see what they say.

Either way that is a bunch of barrels they are making @boissage Thanks for the linky
 

Milkman

Retired Moderator
From my view they looked the size of one I planted 15-20 yrs ago. When I run out of things to do I might call the company and see what they say.

Either way that is a bunch of barrels they are making @boissage Thanks for the linky
The distillery ties those barrels up for lots of years whilst the whiskey ages. My son and I toured the Jack Daniels operation in Tennessee. They have MANY buildings housing thousands of barrels in each.
 
The distillery ties those barrels up for lots of years whilst the whiskey ages. My son and I toured the Jack Daniels operation in Tennessee. They have MANY buildings housing thousands of barrels in each.

Marvin, you are surely correct as they were SUPER TALL AND LARGE warehouses all over the place around that plant.

I made a lot of friends back many years ago when I supplied them all of their filtration requirements. They had an gentleman that conducted tours of their facility and he was their Goodwill Ambassador as he educated all of those tour groups. I used to laugh at him as he told all of these tour groups that they were located in a DRY County and they had the VERY LARGEST VOLUNTER FIRE FIGHTER GROUP IN THE COUNTRY BECAUSE ANY TIME THEY HAD JUST A SMALL FIRE INVOLVED, HECK EVERYONE WITHIN 100 MILES WANTED TO COME AND "HELP" DRINK-UP......I MEAN HELP PUT OUT THE FIRE !!!

HE ALSO STATED THAT EVERY EMPLOYEE THAT WORKED EVERY DAY AND DID NOT MISS ANY TIME AT WORK DURING EACH MONTH WOULD RECIEVE A PINT OF JACK DANIEL WHISKEY AS A BONUS OF SORTS. IN HIS TALK WITH THESE TOUR GROUPS, HE ALSO SAID THAT UNFORTUNATELY SOME EMPLOYEES CAME TO WORK WHEN THEY WERE HALF DEAD AND SICK AS CAN BE "JUST" TO BE ABLE TO GET THAT PINT EVERY MONTH TOO.

Those of you that have seen those HUGE storage warehouses probably didn't realize it BUT there are multiple years of production being aged in "each" warehouse. The reason is if any warehouse caught on fire.....THEY WOULD NOT LOOSE ALL OF THEIR PRODUCTIUON FOR A CERTAIN YEAR OR PERIOD OF TIME AS MANY OF THESE BARRELS WERE AGED FOR 12 YEARS OR SO FOR BEST FLAVOR ETC. ALL OF THAT WORK WAS REALLY LABOR INTENSIVE IN THE STORING PROCESS IN THOSE WAREHOUSES TOO.

It surely was a unique place and their employees were all very nice to me as they knew that I supplied filters throughout their plant. This was back in the 1980's while I was responsible for all sales in the seven Southeastern states including Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Tennessee. Back then, we had 5 manufacturing plants scattered with one in California, two in Texas, one in Georgia and one is South Carolina.

I remember that back in 1984, I sold over $3.7 Million worth of Filters to these seven states and the nearest sales person to me was only at $1.6 million in sales. I won the TIGER AWARD for being the TOP employee of the Company and my wife and I got to fly to New York City and have this award presented to me in the SKY CLUB which encompasses the entire top floor of the Pan Am Building. I received a NICE cash award and my wife received a Fantastic shopping spree at Sak's of 5th Avenue. The fact is that this award still is hanging in my office and I frequently look up at it and smile. Thankfully, I have owned my Filtration company for the past 28 years now, and yes, I am past the normal retirement age BUT I don't want to stop working yet as I am still productive.
 
A white oak has an approximate growth factor of 3 or 4 to 1. 3 to 4 years per 1 inch of diameter of growth. Once they get 20 to 24 in diameter the slow to about 5 to 1
 
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